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DeWine: In-Person Learning 'At Stake'" as Ohio Sets Record for COVID-19 Hospitalizations

BY Pete Grieve

COLUMBUS, OH — Gov. Mike DeWine said Tuesday the ongoing surge of COVID-19 spread in Ohio puts in-person schooling “at stake” if the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, which set new records this week, continue to rise.

“We can turn this heat down. And we can get back to a simmer of this virus instead of a flame starting to really coming up,” DeWine said at his press briefing. “That flame is a direct threat to keeping our kids in schools.” The governor reported grim numbers Tuesday, sharing 216 new COVID-19 hospitalizations occurred in the last 24 hours, the state’s largest daily increase so far in the pandemic, while the total number of hospitalized patients soared to a new record of 1,221 Ohioians receiving hospital care for the virus. “We know as this virus rises, and really there’s this red tide going all the way across Ohio, that a lot of things are at stake. Peoples lives are at stake. We worry about our hospitals starting to fill up. We worry about long-term damage that people might have,” he said. “But as I go through the statistics today… I want to ask you to think about something else that is clearly at stake, and that is whether our kids can be at school.” Due to the worsening spread of the virus, some schools have switched from in-person learning to hybrid models, or switched from hybrid models to fully remote learning. In the last two weeks, 16 districts have scaled back their learning models, DeWine said. DeWine said it should concern all Ohioans that so many schools are online, an environment that is less conducive to effective learning for many students, especially for Ohio children in poor households. Asked if he might take statewide action on schools to slow the spread of the virus, DeWine said there is a better option: Everyone wearing a mask. For now, he will leave decisions to the schools, he said, but he expects more districts will scale back in-person learning if the discouraging trends continue.

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Trump Calls for Bigger COVID Relief Package as Pelosi's Tuesday Deadline Looms

BY Spectrum News Staff & Associated Press
UPDATED 2:52 PM ET Oct. 20, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Tuesday deadline to pass another stimulus package is looming, but it remains to be seen whether or not Congress and President Trump can put aside their differences to come to terms on an economic relief bill.

With a potential deal of almost $2 trillion, Pelosi is angling for the best deal she can get — maybe that’s now, maybe it’s later. It’s a risk she’s willing to take. Trump has upped his offer to $1.8 trillion or more and insisted Monday that “the Republicans will come along” if a deal is reached.

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Expert Warns the Next 6-12 Weeks Will Be "Darkest" of the COVID-19 Pandemic

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 12:45 PM ET Oct. 20, 2020

As coronavirus cases continue to soar across the country, setting record highs in multiple states, one expert warned that the worst may be yet to come.

"The next six to 12 weeks are going to be the darkest of the entire pandemic," Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press."

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The Cost of Reopening Schools Safely

BY Taylor Bruck

CLEVELAND — From portable fogging systems to thermal imaging cameras, Euclid City School District in Northeast Ohio has seemingly thought of it all in terms of protecting its students and staff from the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The camera picks up the image as it comes through the door. This is the sensor that's calibrated to the body temperature. And if that person coming in has a temperature over a hundred degrees, a red box will go around that person's face and we'll stop them and take a secondary reading with a handheld thermometer,” said Patrick Higley, executive director of business operations at Euclid City School District. “We want to have the best academics. We want to have the best extracurricular programs. You’ll see, I think when we walk through, we're going to have some of the best facilities available, and now we want to offer the best opportunities for safety and the health of our students and staff anywhere in the country,” Higley added. With the hopeful hybrid return of all their students around the end of November, teams of people like Higley have been working around the clock to get their students back safely. “We've been working literally night and day to try and get all these systems in place because we wanted to expedite the return of our students and staff as much as we could,” said Higley. Implementing new technology some might not know exists. “We have a bipolar ionization system in place as well, and that is in all of our buildings, throughout the district as well. And it neutralizes the air. Basically they use this type of system in hospital rooms, operating rooms, the ions, the negatively and positively charged ions springs, any kind of air particulates in the air, down to the surface. And within about ten minutes of me touching this store handle, for example, that any kind of residue from me, will be gone,” said Higley. The additional technology and cleaning equipment plus the over 1,100 gallon drums of hand sanitizer ordered, 10,000 customized Euclid Schools face masks for students, and additional 40,000 disposable masks, and more…the price does not come cheap. “Altogether we've spent about $790,000 on all the layers of protection that we put in place within the district,” said Higley. Or without additional effort by those on the frontline to keep the students and staff safe, like cleaning staff member Monica Russell. “It’s a little bit more work, but we do what we have to do because of this pandemic,” said Russell. Thousands upon thousands spent, but all for a good reason. “Everything that we do to keep our kids safe and healthy, and our staff safe and healthy is more than worth the cost of doing that. So number one the health and safety, number two, the education,” said Higley. Some may wonder where the money is coming from for the additional technology and cleaning supplies. Each school allocates their money differently, but many have received money from the federal CARES Act and state and local funding to go toward coronavirus response.

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Indians, Reds Take Significant Financial Hit From 2020 Season

BY Ryan Schmelz

CLEVELAND — The 2020 baseball season is officially over for the Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds, and despite a year where both teams made the playoffs, the losses that won’t appear on any scoreboard are in the bank accounts.

As Progressive Field sits empty in a season without fans, the Tribe lost more than just home field advantage. “The losses in the industry and to us are staggering. I think on an industry level it’s in the billions of dollars and on the team level, it’s tens of millions of dollars in losses that are greater than what we were expecting to start the year," said Indians President Chris Antonetti. “That has a huge impact on the league, and on any individual team, including us.” Dr. Jim Strode, chair and associate professor of sports administration at Ohio University, says it’s not just the loss of ticket sales for both the Reds and Indians, but also less televised games and sponsorship. “When you look at shrinking a season from 162 games to 60 games, right, you’re automatically going to lose revenue. Regardless if it’s media revenue or otherwise. With no fans, obviously you don’t have parking, you don’t have concessions, you don’t have all of the money that comes into the ballpark.” Strode says many Major League Baseball teams don’t disclose their finances, but paying players and whether or not teams can keep fan favorites and superstars, like Indians shortstop Francisco Lindor, could be difficult with declining revenue. “With the Reds and the Indians being right in the middle of payroll, right, and of course with Major League Baseball and a luxury tax, we range from the New York Yankees at the top, to the Baltimore Orioles at the bottom, right? So we don’t have consistent payrolls, we go from 130 million to 30 million," said Strode, “But when you look at, you know, decreased revenue, you’re going to see that it’s going to have an impact on the players that these teams can afford.” And Antonetti says he isn’t sure what the immediate consequences of the economic blow will be, but the franchise is working through it. “What exactly that means, we’re not quite sure, other than, you know, we are in a worse financial position today than we were eight months ago. And we need to chart a course forward that allows us to continue to build competitive teams, but also gets our finances back in order.”

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The Latest Coronavirus Numbers in Ohio

BY Spectrum News Staff

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Every day, the Ohio Department of Health updates Ohioans on the latest coronavirus numbers. The graphics below are update with information provided by the state of Ohio.

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COVID-19 Motivates Health Care Workers to Expand Their Careers

BY Sheena Elzie

CINCINNATI — Amber Joubert is a recent high school graduate dressed head to toe in protective gear, and she hopes what she's doing now will get her a step closer to her goals.

“Since I want to be a nurse, I just decided this will be a step closer to me kinda like having more interaction with patients,” said Joubert. The recent high school graduate is a State Tested Nurse Aide (STNA) and was hired to help with COVID-19 testing. “I’ll disinfect everything and then we’ll start with the nose swabs,” said Joubert. She's working the test sites in Cincinnati along with several others in the field from UC Health.

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FTC: Over 6,000 Reports of Coronavirus-Related Fraud in Ohio

BY Micaela Marshall

CLEVELAND, Ohio — The COVID-19 crisis has brought out the best in people in many ways with the countless efforts underway to help others in need. But it’s also brought out the worst.

Scammers prey on fear and emotion to find victims, and the current pandemic is no exception. The Federal Trade Commission says scams come in the form of calls, texts, and emails. Current tricks center on anything from false claims of COVID-19 cures and preventions, to imposters claiming to be contact tracers, the CDC, or employees at the Ohio Department of Health. There are also scams related to stimulus checks and small business loans — all in an effort to gain personal and often financial information. Across Ohio, the Federal Trade Commission has received over 6,000 reports of coronavirus-related fraud. The FTC estimates there has been over $2.6 million of coronavirus-related fraud loss so far. Here is one defense you can use to protect yourself: "Take your time. The scammers — they could have PH.D.s in psychology. They are so good at knowing exactly what buttons to push, and they know that if they can rush consumers into taking an action, they're more likely to be successful in their scams. So, the best antidote to that is to take your time. Any legitimate operation will allow you to stop and to say you will get back to them before doing anything," said Jon Miller Steiger, Federal Trade Commission East Central Region director. To date, the FTC has sent over 300 warning letters to companies who made suspicious claims and two operations have been sued in federal court for selling non-existent COVID-19 cures. For more information on how to protect yourself or to learn how to report a scam, click here.

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The Foodbank Unveils New Food Distribution Truck

BY Tino Bovenzi

DAYTON, Ohio — When the pandemic began and the ripple effects started to become clear, food insecurity was one of the biggest issues facing Ohioans. And in Montgomery County, the number of those affected continues to rise. To help address the issue by mobilizing their hunger-relief efforts, The Foodbank in Dayton is debuting a new refrigerated food distribution truck.

The new set of wheels were unveiled with a ribbon cutting ceremony. The Foodbank CEO Michelle Riley said with the demand for food-assistance growing due to the pandemic, these trucks will play a key role in their efforts to address hunger in impoverished areas. “We currently serve 106 partner agencies who feed the hungry,” Riley said. “We use these trucks to go into areas where there’s not brick and mortar, basically what we call gaps. We take the truck in, set up a mobile unit, and feed those who are hungry in that area of the community until we get another partner to take over the distribution.” She said during the pandemic The Foodbank has seen a major increase in first-time-families needing assistance — with 81,000 people reporting across the county. “We saw 68 percent increase in our distributions,” Riley said. “Half of those families we had never seen in our life before. They’ve never asked for help before.” This is the second truck of its kind for The Foodbank. And with COVID-19 surging across the region, building a fleet of these trucks was important to safely continue their mission — because the effects caused by the pandemic are expected to linger for months to come. “Regardless of the remediation going forward, we’re still going to have families who take a while to economically get back on their feet,” Riley said. The new refrigerated truck is part of a $237,000 commitment Montgomery County has made to The Foodbank. Montgomery County Commissioner Debbie Lieberman said she proud to back The Foodbank because she knows the work they do is essential. “The service that they proved is so incredible and these trucks now, go out in the community so the people don’t even have to wait in the long line here to get food,” Lieberman said. “Our mobile trucks are really important to get the food out to the people that need it.” For more information on The Foodbank’s mission, including how you can donate to their efforts, visit their website.

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Rural Midwest Hospitals Struggling to Handle Coronavirus Surge

BY Ryan Chatelain

WESSINGTON SPRINGS, S.D. (AP) — Rural Jerauld County in South Dakota didn't see a single case of the coronavirus for more than two months stretching from June to August. But over the last two weeks, its rate of new cases per person soared to one of the highest in the nation.



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The Cost of COVID-19 Hospital Care

BY Taylor Bruck
UPDATED 9:13 AM ET Oct. 17, 2020

OHIO — We learn more about the coronavirus pandemic every day as new details emerge about the virus itself and the cost of treatment. With their health being the main priority, many people don’t focus on the cost initially, but once they’re better, some are finding the cost of treatment to be an additional stress they weren’t prepared for.

For Chris Compton, 19, contracting COVID-19 could mean life-or-death for his family, especially for his sister who has a rare heart condition called Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome. “So, there are a bunch of health issues in my family. Mostly preexisting. I'm one of the few people in my family who don't have a preexisting condition. So, I was very careful in thought of others. And also just for everyone's well-being,” said Compton. Even while being extremely careful, Compton got COVID-19, and despite being young, he said he experienced intense physical reactions. “So, by the fourth day it was just complete, like chest pain, back pain — could not get out of bed. Like, I had a couple of dishes in the sink that I was trying to wash and just getting up and going over to the sink and standing there for like tops three minutes. I was out of breath and I had to go back to bed. It was exhausting,” said Compton. Compton’s currently living with a friend while he’s relocating to Columbus. When Compton tested positive for coronavirus, he quarantined and scheduled a telehealth appointment because of his worsening conditions. “I had a telehealth meeting and she basically was like, because of your chest pain, we need you to go to the hospital in fear that there's a blood clot in your lungs. And at that point... I was speechless,” said Compton. Compton said he was admitted to a hospital in Columbus, where he stayed for about nine hours.

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"Rage Rooms" on the Uptick as People Look To Relieve Pandemic Stress

BY Sheena Elzie

CINCINNATI — Inside the Rage Room, it’s OK to break everything. “I feel like I’m doing something bad, but I’m not,” said Misty Sayers, who went to the Rage Room for the first time.

Sayers is using a bat and sledgehammer and taking it out on a tv, glass, and a car, because she says it helps after a long week at work. “As far as like everyday stress and going to work and everything, and always having to play by the book, and just to be able to come in here and smash stuff. ... It wears you out, but it feels good at the same time,” said Sayers. She’s not alone. More have been coming to the Rage Room that’s inside the Full Throttle Adrenaline Park in Cincinnati. It's a place they weren’t even sure would still be in business. “When we shut down for COVID, nobody knew how long we were gonna shut down. No one knew when we were gonna reopen and what it was gonna look like, or if we were gonna survive,” said Full Throttle Adrenaline Park Spokesperson Tuesday Monsion. But she says once they opened the doors back up, the numbers more than doubled.

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United States Surpasses 8 Million Coronavirus Cases

BY Spectrum News Staff

NATIONWIDE — The United States hit another grim milestone on Friday as the coronavirus pandemic continues to ravage the country, surpassing 8 million cases, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The news comes as the country hits a recent rise in cases per day – the U.S.' one-week average of new daily cases rose above 53,000, according to Johns Hopkins data, increasing about 55% in a little over a month.

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Study: 4 Drugs – Including Remdesivir and Hydroxychloroquine – Have Little To No Effect on COVID-19

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff

GENEVA — The world’s largest randomized trial of COVID-19 treatments found “conclusive evidence” that remdesivir, a drug used to treat U.S. President Donald Trump when he fell ill, has little or no effect on severe cases, the U.N. health agency said Friday.

The World Health Organization announced the long-awaited results of a six-month trial that endeavored to see if existing drugs might have an effect on the coronavirus.

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Old-Fashioned Christmas in the Woods Opens With COVID Precautions

BY Jenna Jordan

COLUMBIANA, Ohio — Thousands of shoppers are getting a head start on the holiday season at an annual event in Columbiana. Old-Fashioned Christmas in the Woods is back for its 26th year, and the COVID-19 pandemic is not stopping this tradition.

Michele Burick said she enjoys spreading Christmas cheer with her hand-crafted characters. “We have fun just dressing them up and making them look special for everybody,” she said. “And this year, we included the masks, so that they were doing their part.” Her fabric figures, and everyone else, wore face coverings while shopping the stalls. “It’s a little more challenging this year,” said Kenneth McGaffic, event owner. “Because what has happened is we’re limited by the health department as to how many people we can have coming into the woods.” Some shoppers waited more than an hour for the chance to browse the more than 200 vendors. “It’s crazy,” said Liz Powell. “There’s a lot of people and a lot of people waiting to get in. There’s a lot of nice stuff here, though.” Each searching to find something on everyone’s wish list, from sweet treats to crafts. All made by hand. Even though this year’s event was not advertised because of the pandemic, folks flocked to the event grounds. “We have people that come from over 30 states that come to attend the event,” said McGaffic. “It’s become a tradition for people.” Signs posted throughout the space reminded people ’tis the season for social distancing. “I anticipated a lot of people,” said Kelli Law. “I didn’t anticipate this many people.” Some shopped for themselves, while others were just looking forward to looking around. “Probably be with family a lot this holiday without visiting so many,” said Law. “So, stuck at the house, at least decorate my house up.” The event was also a chance to share quality time with loved ones. “Remember what they say, ‘Happy wife, happy life,’” said Gary Fordyce. Everyone who attends is happy to find something special. “Right now there’s a group of us looking for that moose,” said Heidi Stuff. “Somebody walked out with it. It’s a really cool stuffed moose. That’s what we’re all heading for.” And that’s what keeps crafters like Burick coming back year after year. “That’s what’s fun about doing them because it brings a smile to people’s faces,” she said. “And that’s what we enjoy about it.” Old-Fashioned Christmas in the Woods is also open 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday, October 17 and Sunday, October 18. Admission is $8. Masks and temperature checks are required.

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Here's What a Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccine Means

BY Adam K. Raymond

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Last month, not long after President Donald Trump said the U.S. military will help distribute millions of doses of a forthcoming COVID-19 vaccine, a conspiracy theory quickly went viral. Stories falsely claiming that the government “plans to force a vaccine on everyone” were quickly debunked by fact-checking websites, but the idea took hold in some of the more paranoid corners of Facebook and YouTube.

For months, conspiracy theories surrounding compulsory COVID-19 vaccination have bounced around social media. The contours of the claims are generally the same, involving forced injections of an unsafe, or in some cases, actively dangerous vaccine. They’ve spread like the virus itself, first within the strident anti-vaccination community and then migrating well outside of it, with fear of “forced” vaccines raised by the likes of tennis superstar Novak Djokovic and former Texas Congressman Ron Paul, father of Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul.

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DeWine: With Record Cases, 'Time to Rethink' Planned Pub Crawls, Political Events, Art Fairs

BY Pete Grieve

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Gov. Mike DeWine shared a bleak update today on the status of COVID-19 in Ohio as the state reported a single-day record of new cases and a doubling in the last month of both the positivity rate and COVID-19 hospitalizations.

Ohio reported 2,187 new cases Thursday, breaking a record set the day before of 2,039 cases. The state’s seven-day average of new cases is at a record high in Ohio, as it is in many Midwest states where spread of the virus is worsening.

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U.S. Jobless Claims Rise To 898,000, Highest Level Since August

BY Spectrum News Staff & Associated Press

NATIONWIDE — The number of Americans filing for unemployment increased last week to hit their highest level since August, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week to 898,000, a historically high number and evidence that layoffs remain a hindrance to the economy’s recovery from the pandemic recession that erupted seven months ago.

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Kent Bans Large Gatherings Amid Rising COVID-19 Cases, Citing Off-Campus Student Parties

BY Kristen Anzuini

KENT, Ohio — The city of Kent has seen a steady rise in coronavirus cases. For the second time in a month, Portage County, where Kent is located, has moved into Red Alert Level 3. The designation is part of a four-level scale indicating the risk of contracting COVID-19 in each county.

To help slow the spread, Kent has passed an ordinance banning gatherings of 10 or more people.

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What’s Behind The Rise in COVID-19 Cases?

BY Erin Billups - National Health Reporter

The number of positive coronavirus cases in the United States is surging upwards, with nearly 40 states reporting a rise in infections. Experts say the worrisome trend points to potentially rough winter months ahead.

According to figures from the COVID-19 Tracking Project, a seven-day average of new cases shows a 35 percent increase in the Midwest and the South. Hospitalizations are also up 27 percent in the Midwest and 48 percent in the South.

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Melania Trump Reveals Her Son Barron Tested Positive for COVID-19 In Personal Reflection

BY Spectrum News Staff

WASHINGTON, D.C. — In a personal reflection about her experience with COVID-19 posted to the White House website, first lady Melania Trump revealed that her teenage son, Barron Trump, tested positive for the coronavirus.

The first lady wrote that after she and her husband, President Donald Trump, tested positive, "my mind went immediately to our son."

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GOP Promises to Keep Ohio Open While Dems Say a Winter Surge of COVID-19 Could Require New Restrictions

BY Pete Grieve

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Republican leaders are promising Ohioans there will be no second shutdown, while Democrats say a surge in COVID-19 transmission this winter should be met with tailored restrictions if the public health community recommends them.

The Trump campaign says there is little daylight between its record and former Vice President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 plan, which also promises testing, PPE production, and vaccine development. But beyond those goals, the parties are more clearly divided in their visions for how to return to normalcy amid continued spread of the virus – an issue at the forefront for Ohio voters.

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COVID Changes Spring Break Plans for Many Ohio Universities

BY Micaela Marshall

OHIO — The threat of COVID-19 continues on college campuses across the state.

That’s leading many universities to look ahead to spring break and decide to either cancel or adjust the vacation time in an effort to stop the spread by limiting travel opportunities.

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Nevada Man First in U.S. to Be Confirmed Infected Twice With Coronavirus

BY Ryan Chatelain

WASHOE COUNTY, Nevada — A Nevada man has been confirmed to be the first person in the U.S. to catch COVID-19 twice.

The 25-year-old Washoe County resident first tested positive for the coronavirus in April after developing symptoms that included a sore throat, cough, headache, nausea and diarrhea, according to a case study published Monday in the medical journal The Lancet. The man, who had no underlying medical conditions, recovered and twice tested negative in May.

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Study: Coronavirus Pandemic To Cost Americans Nearly $16 Trillion

BY Rachel Tillman

NATIONWIDE — The COVID-19 pandemic will likely cost the American people a staggering $16 trillion, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Monday.

The report, which was authored by Harvard University economist David Cutler and former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers, takes into account the “optimistic assumption” that coronavirus will be mostly contained by the Fall of 2021. Even so, the authors say the pandemic is “the greatest threat to prosperity and well-being the US has encountered since the Great Depression.”

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Twitter Flags Trump Tweet Saying He's Immune, Not a Risk to Spread Coronavirus

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Twitter on Sunday deemed President Donald Trump’s declaration that he is now “immune” to the coronavirus and can’t spread it to others as “misleading and potentially harmful.”

On Sunday, the president tweeted he had received “a total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday” and was no longer a threat to transmit the disease.

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Trump Holds First In-Person Event Since Coronavirus Diagnosis

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 2:30 PM ET Oct. 10, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. — President Donald Trump on Saturday made his first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus.

Trump delivered an address on his support for law enforcement from Blue Room balcony to a friendly crowd. The president wore a mask as he walked for the speech but took it off to make his remarks. He received an enthusiastic response from his supporters.

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WHO Reports New Daily High in Global Coronavirus Cases At Over 350,000

BY Associated Press

GENEVA — The World Health Organization has announced a new daily record high in coronavirus cases confirmed worldwide, with more than 350, 000 infections reported to the U.N. health agency on Friday.

The new daily high of 350,766 cases surpasses a record set earlier this week by nearly 12,000. That tally includes more than 109,000 cases from Europe alone.

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Trump's Doctor Says He Can “Return To Public Engagements” Saturday, But Details Slim on Health

BY Associated Press

WASHINGTON, D.C. — President Donald Trump insisted Thursday that he is ready to resume campaign rallies and feels “perfect” one week after his diagnosis with the coronavirus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans, as his doctor said the president had ”completed his course of therapy” for the disease.

The president has not been seen in public — other than in White House-produced videos — since his Monday return from the military hospital where he received experimental treatments for the virus. On Thursday, his physician, Navy Cmdr. Sean Conley, said in a memo that Trump would be able to safely “return to public engagements” on Saturday, as the president tries to shift his focus to the election that’s less than four weeks away, with millions of Americans already casting ballots.

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840,000 Americans Filed for Unemployment Last Week

BY Spectrum News Staff

NATIONWIDE — 840,000 Americans filed for first time unemployment benefits last week, down slightly from the week before, but still far above the all-time pre-pandemic high, according to the Department of Labor.



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Trump Returns To Oval Office Amid Coronavirus Battle

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff

President Donald Trump has returned to the Oval Office for the first time since he was diagnosed and hospitalized with COVID-19.

Spokesperson Brian Morgenstern confirmed that the president returned to the Oval Office on Wednesday. He has been convalescing in the White House residence since he returned from a three-night hospital stay on Monday evening.

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Trump and COVID-19: Where Does Public Health Go From Here?

BY Erin Billups - National Health Reporter

President Trump’s message was clear Monday night; he believes he has bested the vicious coronavirus and the country should not cower in fear of it. In a campaign-style video released on Twitter he characterized his choices that led to his infection as courageous. “I know there’s a risk, there’s a danger. That’s okay. And now I’m better and maybe I’m immune? I don’t know. But don’t let it dominate your lives. Get out there, be careful."

Dr. Perry Hiltakis, dean of Rutgers University School of Public Health says his hopes that Trump would be humbled by his COVID-19 infection were dashed as the president unmasked himself in front of his staff and cameras to record his twitter video.

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Top Trump Aide Stephen Miller Tests Positive for COVID-19

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 11:45 PM ET Oct. 06, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. — President Donald Trump's return to the White House Monday evening was nothing short of dramatic pageantry. Trump ascended the stairs to the White House and promptly removed his protective face mask for photos before declaring that the nation has nothing to fear from COVID-19, despite the fact that it has killed over 210,000 Americans and infected nearly 7.5 million more.

It remains to be seen what Trump's first day back at the White House will bring.

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After a Chaotic Weekend of Trump Battling COVID-19, What Happens Next?

BY Jessica Yellin
UPDATED 11:40 AM ET Oct. 06, 2020

This has been a chaotic stretch for the American public, with confusion and contradiction at just about every turn.

We still don't know much about the president's condition – and with 29 days until Election Day, how will this impact the campaign, what will happen in the Senate, and what is the future of the president's Supreme Court nominee?

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Trump Returns To White House After 3 Days Battling Coronavirus at Hospital

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 8:28 PM ET Oct. 05, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. — President Trump has returned to the White House after spending 3 days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center battling COVID-19.

He immediately ignited a new controversy by declaring that despite his illness the nation should not fear the virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans – and then he entered the White House without a protective mask.

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Trump’s Ride Outside Hospital Draws Ire of Doctors, Secret Service and More

BY Ryan Chatelain
UPDATED 2:38 PM ET Oct. 05, 2020

BETHESDA, Md. — Doctors, secret service agents, and others were appalled by President Donald Trump’s surprise motorcade outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Sunday.

The president appeared outside the hospital, where he is being treated for COVID-19, to wave to his supporters who had been gathered there since Friday night.

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Steroid Prescribed to Trump Recommended Only for Severe COVID-19 Cases, Raising Questions About President's Condition

BY Ryan Chatelain

BETHESDA, Md. — President Donald Trump’s doctors said Sunday he could be discharged from the hospital Monday. But the disclosure that Trump has been prescribed the steroid dexamethasone could be an indication the president’s coronavirus case is more serious than what his medical team is letting on, health experts say.

Dexamethasone is typically reserved for severe cases of COVID-19, not mild or moderate cases. The steroid, which reduces the body’s immune response, is normally only used if a patient’s condition seems to be deteriorating, Dr. Thomas McGinn, the physician-in-chief at Northwell Health on Long Island in New York, told The New York Times.

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Trump Video Update on Condition: “I Feel Much Better Now”

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 11:00 PM ET Oct. 03, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Following his COVID-19 diagnosis, President Donald Trump was flown by Marine One to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Friday night, where he will stay for "a few days," according to the White House.

A feverish and fatigued Trump walked out of the White House Friday night and boarded the helicopter to the military hospital, where he was given remdesivir following treatment with an experimental drug at the White House.

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Lawmakers Offer Well Wishes But Also Pointed Criticism at Trump After Coronavirus Diagnosis

BY Ryan Chatelain

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Joe Biden and members of Congress, including some of President Donald Trump’s harshest critics, are wishing him and first lady Melania Trump a speedy recovery after they announced early Monday they have been infected with the coronavirus.

Some Democrats, however, still took jabs at Trump for being dismissive of the illness he has now contracted.

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Cincinnati Brewery District Revitalization Stalled as Pandemic Impacts Business

BY Michelle Alfini

CINCINNATI, Ohio — Due to shutdowns, restrictions, and social distancing guidelines, the brewing industry has been among the hardest hit in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, in Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, local brewers and historians were in the midst of the region's largest revival since prohibition.

OTR owes its foundation to 19th century German immigrants. They settled in the hillside, bringing brewing along with them, eventually developing a booming beer-based economy. Steve Hampton, the executive director of the OTR Brewery District, said that history attracted him to the same area. As an architect, he said he was fascinated by all the historic buildings throughout the neighborhood and he believed they needed to be preserved, restored, and shared. He took on the project 20 years ago, starting with efforts to make the area safer and more accessible. He developed a master plan that included better sidewalks and increased police patrols. Last year, he launched one of his first tourism-driven efforts, the Brewery Heritage Trail. The trail guides patrons on a marked walking tour of Over-the-Rhine, showing off the historic buildings from the outside, inside, and even underground. “There’s a number of these brewery cellars that remain under buildings that have been torn down because they’re 30-40 feet underground,” Hampton said. Some cellars are completely intact with intricate tunnel systems designed to keep beer cool and transport it easily from building to building. The tour also goes on to describe the fall of German brewing. When prohibition hit, Hampton said few brewers were able to diversify their business and survive. Even the breweries that attempted to reopen didn't last. “We had prohibition in 1919, we had World War I, and all the anti-German hysteria, we had just the exodus of folks from the urban core out to the suburbs,” he said. Now almost a hundred years later, Hampton said a renewed interest in brewing has helped the revitalization efforts catch on. New tenants are moving into the former breweries and supporting his efforts. "These are not current breweries, but they all really love the history and have helped bring that back," he said. While Hampton said the point of his efforts wasn't necessarily to bring back brewing to the neighborhood, he's been surprised to see a lot of new tenants do want to honor the regions roots. His tours start and end at Christian Moerlein, a brewery built in 1853 and revived ten years ago. “Most of these spaces, they’re not taking old homes and converting them," he said. "They’re industrial spaces and really their best use is an industrial use again.” For the time being, most of that public use is on hold. The taproom at Christian Moerlein has been closed since March, and the brewers said retail circulation has suffered due to coronavirus restrictions. Meanwhile, Hampton's tours are on hold as well. He said until the pandemic calms down, he's not comfortable guiding crowds through streets and buildings. He still hopes to expand the heritage trail next year, but he said he'll need renewed interest. For now, it seems much of his plans are on hold, but as a historian, Hampton wants to look to the neighborhoods past to find a path to its future. The brewery district has faced unprecedented obstacles before and he's hopeful it's better prepared to survive again. “To share this asset that we have and bring people, residents, and businesses back to the neighborhood,” he said. In the meantime, Hampton is releasing video to serve as a virtual brewing heritage trail to keep historic interest alive.

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CDC Extends Cruise Ship Ban Through October; White House Reportedly Overrides Director’s Recommendation Beyond Then

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff

ATLANTA — Federal health officials are extending the U.S. ban on cruise ships through the end of October amid reports of recent outbreaks of COVID-19 on ships overseas.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday that it was extending a no-sail order on cruise ships with the capacity to carry at least 250 passengers.

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How Will We Know If a Coronavirus Vaccine Is Safe?

BY Erin Billups - National Health Reporter

Developing a new vaccine is a process that typically takes years, but the urgent need for a COVID-19 vaccine has pushed officials and researchers to find ways of shortening that timeline.

The condensed timeline, however, raises questions over whether a vaccine can really be proven safe and effective in such a short amount of time.

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Hospitals Feel Squeeze as Coronavirus Spikes in Midwest

BY Associated Press

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The coronavirus tightened its grip on the American heartland, with hospitals in Wisconsin and North Dakota running low on space, and the NFL postponing a game over an outbreak that’s hit the Tennessee Titans football team.

Like other states, health officials in Wisconsin had warned since the pandemic began that COVID-19 patients could overwhelm hospitals. That’s now happening for some facilities as experts fear a second wave of infections in the U.S.

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St. Peter in Chains Honors First Responders

BY Camri Nelson

CINCINNATI, Ohio — On Sunday, St. Peter in Chains Cathedral in Cincinnati held it's 16th annual Blue Mass Service to honor its first responders.

“It's great to see law enforcement, to see our brothers that are in the fire service, and EMT, and medics to come together and to be prayed for doing the challenges and the tough year that we've had,” said Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac. Chief Issac was one of close to a dozen first responders to attend Sunday’s service. They prayed, they sang, and members of the police, fire, and sheriff’s office read off the names of first responders who've passed away in the past twelve months. “It's very important to honor the first responders because daily they put their lives on the line for us and for the common good,” said Father Steve Angi, of St. Peter in Chains. “And as a police chaplain riding with them, I see that firsthand, all the time. And I also see how compassionate they could be with people as well.” Father Angi has had the privilege of praying for and blessing these first responders over the years, and this is something that Chief Isaac says he is grateful for. “We have a lot of support, but, you know, it's certainly encouraging to the men and women out here to know that people care and that people are keeping them in their thoughts and prayers and that certainly helps when we go through challenging times,” he said. And after 30 years on the job, Sunday’s service was yet another confirmation for Isaac. “Most of us who answer this type of work, you know, we have a passion for public service and that hasn't changed in over 30 years and I love our city,” he said. “I love our communities, and, you know, it's been our life's work.”

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Some Find Silver Lining in Pandemic

BY Taylor Bruck

GRANVILLE, Ohio — Even among the negativity of the pandemic, some people are finding silver linings. Some have developed closer relationships with family and friends, and others have returned to a simpler way of life.

Twenty years ago, Scott McFarland was as skinny as could be. But the days of looking like he did in his 20s and 30s are gone, and for much of his adult life, he’s struggled with his weight. “It wasn't how I looked as much, I'm okay with how I look, skinny or fat, but it’s how you feel. And when you can't move, when you walk up four stairs and your body's creaking because you're 47 pounds in the obese range, it's time to move on,” said McFarland, a native of Granville. Three years ago, those health issues got serious. McFarland suffered congestive heart failure. When asked what was wrong when he went in, McFarland replied, “congestive heart failure, that’s what they suspected and so my diet had to completely change, I had to give up all the hundreds of thousands of Mountain Dew I was drinking each year, alcohol I had to give that up and the main thing was sodium, I had to cut way back.” As many can relate, life got busy, and the weight started creeping up again. “So, I was never eating normal dinners and healthy stuff. We were eating out a lot, you know you’d pick up the stuff on the way. It seemed like I went from 200 to 220 and before I knew it I was well over 240,” said McFarland. When the pandemic hit in early March, he says he weighed almost 250 lbs. That’s when he said enough is enough. McFarland was furloughed from his job for a few months. So with more time on his hands than ever before, there were no excuses. He began to be more conscious of his eating habits again and began walking the hills and streets near his home. “I’ve come out here for 182 days in a row now,” said McFarland. McFarland is 63 years old and down almost 40 lbs. No magic pill, just consistency and determination to not gain weight during the time off like many predicted would happen to most. “Everybody’s weight was going to go up right, well Scotty’s weight was going to go down and I was pretty convinced that that would happen,” said McFarland. So consistent that even his neighbors look for him on their walks. “I guess we got to know each other by sight and we’d looked for him and then he mentioned that he was losing weight. You’ve lost more since you told us originally, I mean you look great. Not that you didn't look great before but wow, that’s amazing,” said Megan Olbur, Scott’s neighbor. When asked how McFarland feels now compared to the beginning of the pandemic, he said, “Oh, I feel fantastic I really do. I have a lot of family and friends that I enjoy being around on a daily basis and I love life too much to take it for granted, so that’s why I'm out here doing what I do." McFarland knows the seriousness of congestive heart failure and understands next time he might not get another chance. He says in all this madness, he’s found his silver lining -- that is -- prioritizing his health and well-being. “I have a routine and I know what it’s all about now and I'm planning to stick with it,” said McFarland.

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Animal Sanctuary, Hospice Closes Doors Amid COVID-19

BY Jessica Noll
UPDATED 12:00 PM ET Sep. 28, 2020

AMELIA, Ohio — With the soft, melodic sound of a piano playing the theme music from "Nicholas and Alexandra," Clyde lays stretched out on the wooden planks of Perla Kinne's deck, sniffing the brisk autumn air and soaking up the bright morning sunshine. It was time for him to say goodbye.

Internationally-renowned pianist and Liberace protégé, Vince Cardell, had surrendered his beloved 11-year-old English mastiff, Clyde, six months earlier because he was going into a Nashville, Tennessee nursing home in 2012.

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Report: CDC Director Overheard on Phone Call Complaining That Everything Trump Coronavirus Adviser Says Is "False"

BY Ryan Chatelain

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was reportedly overheard Friday expressing his concerns that a member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force is sharing incorrect information with President Donald Trump.

NBC News reported Monday that it overheard the CDC’s Dr. Robert Redfield telling a colleague in a phone conversation that he was alarmed that Dr. Scott Atlas is feeding misleading data to the president on issues such as masks, herd immunity and the impact of the virus on young people. The call came in public on a commercial airline from Atlanta to Washington, D.C.

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Businesses Lose Estimated $95M After COVID Cancels Major Events

BY Sheena Elzie

CINCINNATI, Ohio — A downtown Cincinnati restaurant might be the only place where you can get a loaded grilled cheese doughnut for lunch. The crew at Tom and Chee is busy making them, but the lunch rush isn’t what it used to be.

“What’s really kinda hurt us is when Reds games and Bengals games don’t really get fans,” said Tom and Chee General Manager David Digiacomo. He says they’re losing business because COVID is cancelling major events and limiting games. “People park right here and walk down to the stadium and have a bite to eat before or after the game — that’s really what hurt us was that big loss of foot traffic,” said Digiacomo. He says they’ve already had layoffs and a restaurant close because of COVID, and this will be another hit to the budget. “That’s a number I don’t even wanna think about adding up to,” said Digiacomo. According to the Cincinnati Visitor’s and Convention Bureau, it’s $95M. That's how much they calculate businesses lost in Hamilton County since the pandemic began in March. It’s the reason David Digiacomo and his crew are relying on something else to try to make up for the loss, one grilled cheese doughnut at a time. “Every catering order that comes in, we jump at it,” said Digiacomo, “even if it’s 50 sandwich or box orders, if it’s a $1000 order, we’re gonna jump at it because we need that income," he said. It could be even longer before businesses fully recover from the multi-million dollar loss.

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Woman Arrested, Tased at Football Game After Confrontation Over Masks

BY Pete Grieve

COLUMBUS, Ohio — An Ohio woman who refused to wear a mask at a Logan-Hocking School District middle school football game was tased and arrested Wednesday evening for trespassing, authorities said.

Logan-Hocking Superintendent Monte Bainter said the incident, which occurred at Logan High School, began when the woman was asked to leave for violating the school and the state’s rules. “An attendee was asked to comply with the Ohio High School Athletic Association’s and the athletic facility’s policies,” Logan-Hocking superintendent Monte Bainter said. “The attendee refused to do so and consequently was asked to leave by the attending law enforcement officer." A school resource officer, Chris Smith, observed the woman, Alecia Kitts, sitting in the stands without a mask, Logan police said. He approached her to tell her she needed to put a mask on, as is required by the school's policy. According to police, she responded that she had asthma and would not wear a mask. Smith warned her she would be cited for trespassing and escorted off the property if she refused to comply. Kitts was asked to leave the stadium when she continued to refuse to wear a mask, police said. She declined to leave. Eventually, Smith told her she was under arrest for criminal trespassing and asked her to put her hands behind her back, police said. Again, she refused to comply. A video recorded by a spectator shows Kitts refusing to be handcuffed while Smith struggled to detain her. Prior to the arrest, police said Smith warned her repeatedly she would be tased if she did not allow herself to be handcuffed. As she continued to resist, Smith stunned her in the shoulder with his taser, police said. In the video, Kitts did not appear to lose consciousness or fall to the ground, but after deploying his taser Smith was then able to fasten handcuffs around her wrists. Police stressed that Kitts was arrested for trespassing, not for refusing to wear a mask. “It is important to note, the female was not arrested for failing to wear a mask. She was asked to leave the premises for continually violating school policy. Once she refused to leave the premises, she was advised she was under arrest for criminal trespassing, she resisted the arrest, which led to the use of force,” police said. “This is an unfortunate incident for everyone involved.”

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Bucking All The Rules, One Ohio County Has Avoided the Virus

BY Pete Grieve

CALDWELL, Ohio — In Noble County, compliance with Ohio’s mask mandate is poor, health officials frequently encounter hostility when they make contract tracing phone calls, and coronavirus conspiracies are popular, yet the county has maintained the lowest occurrence of COVID-19 anywhere in the state.

Residents and officials say a bit of good fortune combined with natural factors, particularly the lack of dense population areas, have spared this area in the rolling hills of Southeast Ohio from experiencing community spread of the virus. Of the county’s 14,500 residents, only 27 people have tested positive for the virus or been identified as probable cases. The village of Caldwell, the county seat, is home to the courthouse, the banks, two of the county’s schools, and a handful of shops and restaurants, which are mostly family businesses that have been around for generations servicing residents from the entire county. Caldwell was a “ghost town” in the spring, says shop owner Richard Brienza of Mike’s Tire Shop, who does business in the town square. Hardly any stores were open. Some days there was not a single car on the square.

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Jobless Claims Rise to 870,000 as Fraud, Backlogs Cloud Data

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff

NATIONWIDE — The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment aid rose slightly last week to 870,000, according to the U.S. Labor Department, a historically high figure that shows that the viral pandemic is still squeezing restaurants, airlines, hotels and many other businesses six months after it first erupted.

The figure coincides with evidence that some newly laid-off Americans are facing delays in receiving unemployment benefits as state agencies intensify efforts to combat fraudulent applications and clear their pipelines of a backlog of jobless claims.

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Mortgage Assistance Program Saving Families From Foreclosures

BY Tino Bovenzi

DAYTON — Julie Stevenson is no stranger to hardship or adversity. “The last four or five years has been a bit of a struggle,” she said. “I just purchased the house in '15, and then was diagnosed with breast cancer in '16. So I’ve spent the past four years working more hours than I probably should and trying to heal at the same time so I wouldn’t lose my house.”

After years of treatment, Julie beat breast cancer. But just as soon as she was starting to recover financially, here comes another wave of trouble. “I just start to see a little bit of daylight, then the COVID hit,” she said. “It’s just been a rough ride.” With money being tight, Julie was in jeopardy of losing something very sentimental to her — her home. And the thought of moving in the middle of the pandemic is something she wanted to avoid at all cost. “There’s just too much going on with this pandemic and having to stay six feet away from people and try to hunt for a place to live,” Stevenson said. “I’ve got a little bit of family, but nobody that I would be able to stay with.” But thankfully for Julie, help was available. In Montgomery County, people struggling to pay their mortgage can apply for assistance through the HomeOwnership Center’s Mortgage Assistance Program if they have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Application Processor Kelly Lehman said $5 million in CARES act relief funds were awarded to help with mortgage assistance in the Dayton area. “Any loss of income in a household due to COVID, loss of hours, loss of job, illness that caused people to not be able to pay their mortgages and become delinquent,” Lehman said. “We’ve given away a million dollars to 184 families so far, there’s $4 million left, it’s here until December the 31st.” Administrative Coordinator Marva Williams-Parker said people who are experiencing hardship shouldn’t feel embarrassed to ask for help. “I’ve always been taught that pride comes before fall, so don’t let your pride leave you homeless,” Williams-Parker said. And she said that the program is set up to help all races and socioeconomic backgrounds. “African-American, Hispanic, Asian, whatever, we want to help you,” Williams-Parker said. “We have the money. We have the funds. We have the resources to do so. So if you are a person that has a mortgage, don’t let anything stop you from coming in. Our desire is to help you.” Lehman said it’s important for people in Dayton to know they aren’t alone in the struggle they are facing. “We have such grit and we rise to the challenge, well, this time let somebody help,” Lehman said. It’s help that Stevenson will forever be grateful for. “You can only do so much on your own, and after a certain point, like after the four or five years that I’ve had, I just needed some help,” Stevenson said. “And I would encourage anyone who’s struggling the same way I am to please apply. Please apply because it wasn’t a hard process. I was so grateful. I got tears in my eyes when they say I was approved.” To qualify for the Mortgage Assistance Program you have to meet some specific criteria, which is listed on the HomeOwnership Center of Greater Dayton’s website.

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Dr. Fauci: "Growing Optimism" There Could Be a Coronavirus Vaccine By End of 2020 or Early 2021

BY Spectrum News Staff

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, told a Senate committee that he has "growing optimism" that scientists will find one or more safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine by late 2020 or early 2021, and that the United States could have enough doses for every American by April.

Fauci echoed a similar timeline to the one being espoused by President Trump, as he, along with CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield and FDA commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn, testified before the Senate Health Committee Wednesday about the Trump Administration's response to the coronavirus.

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Akron Bar is First in Ohio to Lose Liquor License Over COVID-19 Violations

BY Alexa Maslowski

AKRON, Ohio — The Ohio Liquor Control Commission cited a total of six COVID-19 violations on three separate days at Highland Tavern in Akron. The violations include sale and consumption of alcohol after 11:00 p.m. and disorderly activities.

“The vast majority of business owners and managers are doing the right thing. They’re doing everything they can to comply with the Department of Health orders as well as all of the emergency rules from the Ohio Liquor Control Commission,” said Enforcement Commander Eric Wolf of the Ohio Investigative Unit (OIU). They investigate every complaint they get about a restaurant or bar’s compliance with state laws.

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CDC Backtracks on Airborne Spread of COVID-19

BY Lindsay Oliver

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The CDC backed down from guidance it released over the weekend on how it believes coronavirus is spread.

Over the weekend, the CDC changed its guidance to say coronavirus could be transmitted through the air.

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CDC Issues Guidance Recommending Against Traditional Halloween Activities

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 6:30 PM ET Sep. 22, 2020

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidelines recommending against traditional Halloween activities this fall due to the pandemic.

The agency says Halloween staples like door-to-door trick-or-treating, crowded costume parties, and haunted houses are considered higher risk for transmitting COVID-19.

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Report: Pentagon Spent Money Meant for Coronavirus Response on Unrelated Projects

BY Ryan Chatelain

WASHINGTON — In March, Congress, through the CARES Act, gave the Pentagon $1 billion to “prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.” Instead, most of the fund has been paid to defense contractors for projects unrelated to COVID-19, such as jet engine parts, space surveillance, body armor and dress uniforms, according to a report Tuesday.

The taxpayer money was allocated under the Defense Production Act, which allows President Donald Trump to order U.S. companies to manufacture products in the nation’s interest.

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Farm Market Honors First Responders

BY Camri Nelson

SPRING VALLEY, Ohio — Since the pandemic hit, first responders and medical professionals have been doing all they can to keep people safe. And that's why the Apple Country Farm Market in Spring Valley is showing its appreciation in a creative way.

The farm's corn maze is where all the fun begins. It’s more than seven acres, and this year’s theme is called “Thanks to Our Heroes.” “You hear about all the essential workers and how everyone that's out there on the first line is really taking a risk,” said Marcie Hagler, Apple Country Farm Market managing member. As a daughter of a former police officer, Hagler says it was important to show her appreciation for first responders. “Oftentimes, I don’t think they’re given the right credit for all that they’re doing,” she said. But the theme of this year’s maze isn’t the only thing that’s different. This year, instead of three corn maze games, there’s only one — it’s called “The Day Farmer Joe Went Missing.” “Someone kidnapped Farmer Joe and the gist of it is to find out which animal was the culprit, what weapon they used to kidnap him with, and where it happened,” said Hagler. It's a game that many families like the Bernhardts are having fun with. “We enjoyed going through,” said Deedee Bernhardt, one maze-goer. “It was easy to find out way back out. But it was fun because they had some spin-the-wheel Simon Says Things in there and the girls enjoyed doing that and they got to clip-pity clop like a horse and growl like a bear and play Marco Polo. It was really fun.” And that’s exactly why Hagler and her team decided to keep this game for the 2020 fall season. “It was the game that we really felt like we could offer and offer it properly, as far as the guidelines — being touchless and not having to touch hole punches throughout the maze,” said Hagler. Overall Hagler says she’s impressed with opening day and the support they’ve received from the community. “People love the theme,” said Hagler. “I’ve had several phone calls of people who said to me I’m not a big maze-goer but I love your theme and I’m going to come out and support it just because of the theme of ‘Thanks to our Heroes.’ So that was great to get positive feedback.” The maze is open Friday to Sunday until Nov. 1. For more information visit the Apple County Farm Market's website.

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CDC Says Aerosol Guidance Was "Posted in Error" to Website

BY Ryan Chatelain
UPDATED 1:16 PM ET Sep. 21, 2020

ATLANTA — On Friday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated their guidelines to say that the coronavirus can be spread through tiny respiratory droplets called aerosols that can linger in the indoor air.

But, according to reports from The Washington Post and CNBC, the CDC now says that it was posted on its website in error.

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Toned-Down Oktoberfest Kicks Off Amid Coronavirus Restrictions

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff

BERLIN — Oktoberfest celebrations got underway Saturday in Munich with the traditional tapping of a keg and the cry of “O’zapft is!” – “It’s tapped!” – but this year’s festival is very non-traditional and highly regulated due to coronavirus concerns.

The official Oktoberfest has been cancelled, so there’s no huge tents full of people or hundreds of stands selling food. Instead, 50 of the southern German city’s beer halls and other establishments are hosting their own, smaller parties that follow guidelines on mask wearing, social distancing and other restrictions.

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Ohio State Becomes Ohio's Largest COVID-19 Outbreak So Far

BY Pete Grieve
UPDATED 7:06 PM ET Sep. 20, 2020

COLUMBUS, Ohio — While the spread of COVID-19 at Ohio State University is trending downward, the university set a record this week no one wanted to see broken when its count of positive tests surpassed that of Marion Correctional Institution, making the outbreak at the Columbus campus Ohio’s largest so far.

The university’s dashboard showed 2,580 cumulative positive tests as of the latest update Friday evening. Ohio State's outbreak is among the largest of campus outbreaks nationally. The University of Georgia (3,538) and the University of Alabama (2,688) have reported more positive tests.

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Miss Heart of Ohio Creates Pandemic Pen Pals

BY Olivia Wile

MANSFIELD, Ohio — Brooke Young has made a habit of mailing letters to individuals she’s never met in person.

“I would say my favorite part is knowing that we did something collectively as a whole — that we were able to bring people together during the isolation of this time,” said Young.

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Twisted Sister Singer to Anti-Maskers: Don't Use Our Song

BY Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Twisted Sister singer Dee Snider took to social media to condemn anti-maskers who went into a Florida Target store blaring the group's hit “We're Not Gonna Take It" while ripping off their masks.

In a tweet Wednesday, Snider called the stunt “moronic," and shared a video that was recorded by an upset customer inside the Target at Coral Ridge Mall in Fort Lauderdale. The video had more than 30 million views.

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Pediatricians: Get Your Kids a Flu Vaccination by End of October

BY Rebecca Turco

Pediatricians recommend it is more important than ever to get vaccinated for the flu, even amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends parents vaccinate their children by the end of October. The academy also recommends everyone six months of age and older get an annual influenza vaccine.

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Could Wildfires Worsen Symptoms of COVID-19 and Flu?

BY Erin Billups - National Health Reporter

As wildfires become more common, research on the health impacts is growing. A study from the University of British Columbia found that during Canada’s wildfire season, more ambulances were dispatched to treat heart and respiratory issues within just one hour of exposure to smoke.

Another study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found the risk of California residents experiencing cardiac arrests on the second day of wildfire smoke, was 70 percent higher, than on days with no smoke. The impact was greater among lower income residents.

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5 Ways COVID-19 Exposed Health Equity Issues for Minorities

BY Julie Gargotta

ORLANDO, Fla. — While African Americans make up around 13 percent of the U.S. population, they account for 21 percent of COVID-19 related deaths, according to the latest CDC data.

What accounts for the disparity in who is dying from the disease? Here are five things to consider when it comes to health equity.

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How Blood Type Affects Covid-19 Impact

BY Roy De Jesus

Tampa, Fla. - There's more evidence our blood type could be connected to how severe Covid-19 impacts us.

Genetic testing bio tech 23andMe's upcoming study is one of the largest yet.

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Trump Denies Downplaying Coronavirus, Casts Doubt on Mask Usage

BY Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Fielding compelling questions about voters’ real-world problems, President Donald Trump denied during a televised town hall that he had played down the threat of the coronavirus earlier this year, although there is an audio recording of him stating he did just that.

Trump, in what could well be a preview of his performance in the presidential debates less than two weeks away, cast doubt on the widely accepted scientific conclusions of his own administration strongly urging the use of face coverings and seemed to bat away the suggestion that the nation has racial inequities.

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Trump Claims Coronavirus Vaccine May Come "In a Matter of Weeks"

BY Spectrum News Staff

NATIONWIDE — In an interview with "Fox & Friends," President Donald Trump claimed Tuesday that a coronavirus vaccine could be approved "in a matter of weeks."

"We're going to have a vaccine in a matter of weeks. It could be four weeks, it could be eight weeks," Trump said, claiming he was "not doing it for political reasons."

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Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade Will Not Be Live, Mayor Says

BY Spectrum News Staff , Kathleen Culliton and Shannan Ferry
UPDATED 11:44 PM ET Sep. 14, 2020

NEW YORK — There won't be a live Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in 2020, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday.

Concerns about novel coronavirus spurred organizers to move the iconic celebration online, the mayor said.

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Oxford, AstraZeneca Coronavirus Vaccine Trial Resumed

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff and Associated Press
UPDATED 4:24 PM ET Sep. 13, 2020

LONDON — Oxford University announced Saturday it was resuming a trial for a coronavirus vaccine it is developing with pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, a move that comes days after the study was suspended following a reported side-effect in a U.K. patient.

In a statement, the university confirmed the restart across all of its U.K. clinical trial sites after regulators gave the go-ahead following the pause on Sunday.

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Have You Gotten Your Stimulus Check? How to File With the IRS

BY Christie Zizo
UPDATED 2:49 PM ET Sep. 11, 2020

ORLANDO, Fla. — If you haven't gotten your stimulus payment yet, you have until October 15 to file a claim with the IRS.

The IRS is sending letters out to an estimated 9 million people with instructions, the agency said this week.

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Fauci Says He's "Depressed" Coronavirus Numbers Aren't Lower

BY Ryan Chatelain

NATIONWIDE — Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, warned that Americans should brace for a tough next few months in the fight against the coronavirus.

Speaking Thursday during a panel discussion with doctors from Harvard Medical School, Fauci said, “We need to hunker down and get through this fall and winter because it’s not going to be easy.”

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Miami University Becomes Ohio's Second Worst COVID-19 Outbreak While Infected Students Host Parties

BY Pete Grieve
UPDATED 6:30 AM ET Sep. 11, 2020

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Miami University of Ohio’s COVID-19 case numbers surpassed the University of Dayton’s Thursay, becoming the state’s second largest active outbreak behind Ohio State.

This comes as a group Miami students, who were captured on video telling officers they are COVID-19 positive, face citations for hosting a party this weekend. Bodycam footage released by the local police department Wednesday showed the officer questioning the student after he ran his ID through a database that showed the student had recently tested positive.

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‘The Cost of Care’: Understanding Empathy Fatigue

BY Alexa Maslowski

CLEVELAND, Ohio — From the coronavirus pandemic to racial injustices, wildfires, and hurricanes, it's easy to feel burned out or emotionally drained. Experts are calling this "Empathy Fatigue," and it largely impacts frontline and healthcare workers.

Cleveland Clinic Psychologist Dr. Susan Albers says Empathy Fatigue is emotional and physical exhaustion — a profound decrease in a person’s ability to be empathetic or simply to care.

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Cleveland-Based Athersys Holding COVID-19 Stem Cell Therapy Clinical Trials

BY Micaela Marshall

Photo courtesy of Athersys

CLEVELAND, Ohio — The World Health Organization considers Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, or "ARDS," to be the leading cause of death among COVID-19 infected patients. A Cleveland-based biotechnology company is holding clinical trials to see if its stem cell therapy could help COVID-19 induced ARDS patients.

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Coronavirus in the Classroom: How Air Flow May be Key to Safely Reopen Schools

BY Erin Billups - National Health Reporter
UPDATED 11:00 AM ET Sep. 09, 2020

As more is understood about how the coronavirus spreads, greater attention is being paid to the air inside schools. National Health Reporter Erin Billups takes a look at the latest recommendations and why it matters.

The indoor air quality of educational institutions has come into laser focus, because we now know that the coronavirus can transmit through aerosols.

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Ohio State Sends Students to Quarantine at a Marriott as Isolation Dorms Fill

BY Pete Grieve
UPDATED 2:15 PM ET Sep. 08, 2020

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Several buses shuttled COVID-19 positive Ohio State students to a Marriott hotel near campus Thursday where the students will isolate for the next two weeks.

Ethan Deutsch, a sophomore who lives in campus housing, received a call from a university employee around 1:00 p.m. Thursday informing him that he would need to pack up and head to a bus stop in the North Campus area that afternoon. Deutsch was notified in the morning that his test came back positive. The result was not a surprise, he said. The notice came just as his symptoms started to worsen. “At first, it felt like really high-tier allergies, and I wasn’t sure that I was sick until I woke up this morning and I felt really bad,” he said. He was given the choice to go home, but he opted to quarantine with the university, which meant going to the hotel. “They told me that the current quarantine dorms are full so they would be moving us to the Marriott today,” Deutsch said. Three buses transported students to the hotel Thursday. Students were assigned to a bus that had a pick-up location near their residence. Deutsch said the bus driver stepped off the bus while about a dozen students boarded. The first four rows of seats were blocked off to separate positive students from the driver. At the hotel, students formed two single file lines to check-in. They received a supply of food, a gallon of water, an information pamphlet, an activity sheet, and a resistance exercise band. The accommodations have been luxurious and the university handled the situation responsibly, Deutsch said. “They are treating us very well. The desk space is a kinda small for college students—it depends on what your workload is—but it’s a very nice room,” he said. The university declined to comment on students being quarantined in hotels. A university spokesperson cited privacy reasons. The hotel front desk referred a request for comment to the university’s student life office. Ohio State has launched a COVID-19 dashboard that shows how many students are in isolation and quarantine dorms. As of Sept. 1, 208 students who have tested positive were in isolation, 104 students who have been exposed were in quarantine, and 150 beds were available.

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9 Drug Companies Pledge That Coronavirus Vaccines Will Be Safe, Effective

BY Ryan Chatelain

NEW YORK — Aiming to boost public trust in a coronavirus vaccine, the heads of 9 pharmaceutical companies have pledged together not to rush out a vaccination before it is proven safe and effective.

The joint statement was issued Tuesday by the CEOs of AstraZeneca, BioNTech, GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Moderna, Novavax, Pfizer and Sanofi.

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Pandemic Can Create Child Attachment Issues

BY Taylor Bruck

OHIO — With the increased time spent at home because of the pandemic and the continuation of virtual learning, some psychologists are saying children may have a harder time adjusting back to normal life, whenever that time comes.

“We suspect that following this pandemic period, there might be a variety of responses that children might experience following all of this time off. And one of those might certainly be hesitation or some separation anxiety from separating from caregivers,” said Dr. Samanta Boddapati, a pediatric psychologist at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

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Pandemic Forces Fundraising Events To Go Virtual

BY Michelle Alfini

Photo courtesy of Freestore Foodbank

CINCINNATI, Ohio — Labor Day weekend typically brings thousands to the banks of the Ohio River for Cincinnati's Riverfest, and the Freestore Foodbank's Rubber Duck Regatta gets things started. Due to COVID-19, the festival was canceled and the regatta went virtual.

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COVID-19 Changes Fireworks Celebrations

BY Camri Nelson

CINCINNATI, Ohio — It’s a tradition that dates back nearly 50 years — hundreds of thousands of people descending upon Cincinnati’s Riverfront for the annual WEBN fireworks celebration.

Joe Rozzi is in charge of setting off the annual display – which normally takes place during Riverfest. But unlike similar events across the state, this one isn’t being canceled. Instead, Rozzi and his team got creative to keep the holiday weekend tradition alive. “We approached a number of people that we know and finally came up with a plan that worked,” he said. Instead of being set off downtown, the fireworks have been moved to an undisclosed location and are just being broadcast on TV. “We know that and there’s something about not being there personally,” said Rozzi. “Trust me, I know. I’m going to miss the ride up the river. I’ve done that for the past 30-something years, but it’s all about the fireworks and that’s what it started out as — a fireworks show.” And while this year’s show has a different feel and sound, organizers are diving into their back of tricks to make it special in its own right. “We always do something new and something different, and the show is always designed for television because there is an audience, and even though it’s not live, it’s much better, it’s much different,” he said. “You can’t smell the smoke. You can’t feel the thump in your chest, but it’s still done in a frame.” And that frame is helping brighten the skies during an otherwise dark year.

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Model Predicts US Coronavirus Death Toll Could Reach 410,000 by January

BY Shannon Caturano

The coronavirus death toll in the United States could more than double by the end of the year, reaching 410,000, according to a study released by health officials on Friday.

The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington released the new model, projecting that the daily deaths could more than triple to 3,000 per day by the end of the year if mask usage stays at current rates.

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DeWine Warns Ohioans of COVID-19 Threat Ahead of Holiday Weekend

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine spent his time at the podium Thursday laying out a dire warning: If Ohioans don’t continue social distancing and masking up during the upcoming holiday weekend, it will be a catalyst that undoes all the progress we’ve made thus far.

He says he knows this for a fact, since it happened during the Fourth of July.

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Research Roundup: Here's What We Have Learned About Coronavirus Recently

BY Maddie Burakoff
UPDATED 2:37 PM ET Sep. 04, 2020

MILWAUKEE (SPECTRUM NEWS) — In recent months, the scientific world has seen a steady flow of research updating what we know about the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and how it affects humans. Because the virus is so new, researchers are still grappling with many questions about its function. And because of the nature of the scientific process, no single study can completely answer those questions. Instead, new research is constantly challenging our understanding of the pandemic.

Here, we explore some recent studies that have shed new light on the virus.

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New Grant Helps Childcare Programs Stay Afloat During Pandemic

BY Camri Nelson

CINCINNATI, Ohio — The Pandemic Support Payment Grant is helping many childcare facilities across Ohio like Nature with Nurture Preschool and Day School here in Cincinnati stay open while reducing class and ratio sizes.

Like many childcare programs, Nature with Nurture had to overcome a number of challenges. Owner Queshell Redmond says one of the biggest— reducing the teacher to child ratios. “It was the most daunting responsibility I have had since I opened,” said Redmond. “How do you tell which parents that they can't come?” Redmond had to go from being at full capacity before the pandemic to operating at less than 40 percent. Despite the setback, she decided to come up with a game plan to tackle the situation. “At first it was daunting and it was scary,” she said. “It was how am I going to find care for two days, opposed to five days, and we looked at it as a perspective as we are in this together on how best to fit everyone's needs as opposed to just singling out certain people.” And then, after the shutdown and reworking her entire business, she heard the state was going to help. Governor Mike DeWine allocated $60 million toward the Pandemic Support Payment Grant. This grant helps childcare facilities that want to operate at lower teacher to children ratio stay open. “With that grant, we were able to still stay afloat,” said Redmond. “We were able to obtain new staffing for those new requirements, per the pandemic rules of opening childcare which, to me, is the best, best scenario, ever, because now we are ensuring safety.”

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Bill Aims To Nix Testing Requirements During COVID

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Senate Bill 385 aims to take some of the pressure off this unprecedented academic year.

“Senate Bill 358 is going to give flexibility to educators, and thereby students, to be able to focus on daily lessons and really advancing their educational information without the stress of worrying about testing and score cards,” said Sen. Nickie Antonio (D-Cleveland), the bill's co-sponsor.

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LOCAL RESOURCES
Symptoms

The 2019 novel coronavirus may cause mild to severe respiratory symptoms like:

  • cough
  • fever
  • trouble breathing and
  • pneumonia

The CDC believes symptoms may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus.

(Source: NYS DOH)