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CORONAVIRUS NEWS

Student Teachers Go Virtual to Finish Classroom Hours

BY Tonisha Johnson

BLUFFTON, Ohio — Thanks to a new educational program and social media, student teachers at Bluffton University in northwest Ohio are finishing out their semester through a study buddy program. The program, which is set to help kids with schoolwork during the stay-at-home order, has blossomed into something much bigger than anticipated.

Just a couple of weeks in and the handful of student teachers from Bluffton University are maximizing their final semester before heading out into the real world to teach. So far, the experience has stretched their creativity and kept them on their toes. During the week, five-year-old Franklin reads to his new study buddies, who are looking to become teachers soon. His dad, Jack Hutchins said he's grateful for the opportunity. "Yeah he's not been out very much the past couple of weeks. He's just kind of been hanging around the house because of the Coronavirus." He's one of about 15 to 20 kids that log into the Bluffton University Study Buddies site each day from across the country. All of them are getting help with schoolwork and other skills.

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Who Gets the Stimulus Check? Coronavirus Unemployment Bill Explained

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 7:55 PM ET Apr. 01, 2020

The $2 trillion stimulus bill, known as the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, President Trump signed last week is meant to prevent an economic freefall as the nation reels from the COVID-19 outbreak. It offers help for businesses and local governments -- and also provides direct payments to qualifying Americans.

Related Content: Full COVID-19 Coverage

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Congress Stalled Because of Coronavirus

BY Taylor Popielarz

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The halls of Capitol Hill are quiet enough to hear a pin drop these days.

- Congress out of session until at least April 20 - Ohio lawmakers adjusting to new norm of working from home - Despite other work being stalled, members say coronavirus deserves full attention

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Hobby Lobby Defies Stay At Home Order

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio– Ohio's Attorney General is intervening as Hobby Lobby defies the statewide "stay-at-home" order and reopens its stores amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Stores around the country, and in Ohio, like these we found in the Columbus and Dayton areas, reopened prior to the order's expiration. The order, which affects all non-essential businesses, remains active.

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DeWine Orders Hospitals to Stop Private Lab Testing for COVID-19

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Lots of new information came out of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s press briefing Wednesday, but most noteworthy is that the governor wants to stop all private lab testing for COVID-19. The reason? It takes too long. DeWine said it was “unacceptable” for labs to take 5-6 days to turn around test results.

“It’s unacceptable to the patient, it’s unacceptable for the rest of us, because knowing when someone tests positive or doesn’t test positive is information that we very, very desperately need,” DeWine said.

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What to Do If You Test Positive for COVID-19

BY Erin Billups
UPDATED 4:07 PM ET Apr. 01, 2020

COVID-19 cases are rising across the country. Large-scale efforts like lockdowns and social gathering bans are helping slow the spread, but containment efforts shouldn't stop at your front door.

According to the CDC, if you or someone you live with tests positive for COVID-19, or is exhibiting common symptoms like cough, fever and shortness of breath, you should stay home and contact your doctor or local health department.

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Coronavirus: The Fight to Breathe

BY Erin Billups
UPDATED 4:05 PM ET Apr. 01, 2020

Photo credit: John Minchillo/AP

Every day, the number of positive confirmed coronavirus cases rise, and the urgent call for ventilators increases.

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UC Medical Students Assisting Seniors Through COVID-19

BY Tino Bovenzi

CINCINNATI, Ohio — For senior citizens, making a trip to the grocery store or pharmacy is simply not safe during this coronavirus pandemic —which has created a large need for assistance all across the state.

But luckily for residents of Greater Cincinnati, a group of University of Cincinnati medical students are offering a helping hand.

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Docs Say Stop Wearing Contacts, for Now

BY Alexa Maslowski

CLEVELAND, Ohio — 40 million people across the United States wear contact lenses. But experts say we should stop for the time being and wear our glasses instead.

Dr. Thomas Steinemann is an ophthalmologist with MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland and the American Academy of Opthalmology. He says contact lens wearers touch their eyes and face much more than people who don’t wear contacts.

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Heart Association Advises Caution During Outbreak

BY Ryan Schmelz

CLEVELAND, Ohio — There's a lot of information about how the coronavirus affects the lungs, but what about the heart?

Like many doctors across the country, Doctor Eiran Gorodeski’s world has dramatically changed. “Life seems to have completely flipped upside down in the medical system just like it has for all of us in the U.S.,” said Gorodeski. Gorodeski is a cardiologist with University Hospitals and says medical experts are learning new information about COVID-19 every day. "It’s not anything we’ve heard or learned about or dealt with in the medical world. There is a flurry of publications coming out in medical literature on a day by day basis," he said. The American Heart Association is advising caution for people with cardiovascular disease and hypertension. It says data from China shows an increased fatality rate of 10.5 percent and 6 percent respectively. "The infection is very taxing on the cardiovascular system," said Gorodeski. "People with preexisting cardiovascular disease just seem to have less of an ability to withstand the stresses on the cardiac system that having severe lung infection can have." There’s ways for all of us to stay healthy and prevent COVID -19, like social distancing and washing hands. But there are other steps that those with cardiovascular disease and hypertension can take. "We know that if patients stop taking their medications, they’re at a very high risk for decompensating, for getting worse, and certainly this is not the time where you want to get sicker when you can avoid it, with the healthcare system having, you know switched essentially into war mode." He also encourages people to take advantage of virtual visits with their doctor, and also keeping a strong mental health. "Whatever people can do to keep your anxiety and stress under control, whether it’s exercising regularly or using meditation, I think it would be another thing to keep in mind." The American Heart Association says it’s committing $2.5 million to research efforts to better understand COVID-19 and how it affects the heart.

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Coronavirus Q&A With the Doctor

BY Lindsay Oliver

COLUMBUS, Ohio- Every Wednesday, Dr. Iahn Gonsenhauser from OSU's Wexner Medical Center will be answering viewer questions.

QUESTION: You hear that the warmth of spring and especially summer will weaken the virus. Is this true, and how? Conversely, would a cold snap kill the virus on the surface of things?

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Parents Strive to Achieve Balance With Homeschooling, Work

BY Tonisha Johnson

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Becoming a child's full-time teacher at home during this COVID-19 quarantine has turned out to be a frustrating and scary thing all at the same time. Yet, many parents are making the best of it, as they juggle a school schedule and their work schedule.

Shortly after watching the morning announcements at St. Mary's School in Columbus, Chelsea Hill and her three girls gathered around the table to get the school day started.

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Civil Legal Aid to Benefit from Coronavirus Stimulus Bill

BY Karlynn Wells

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Legal Services Corporation is an independent nonprofit established by Congress in 1974 to provide financial support for civil legal aid to low-income Americans.

The organization's president Ron Flagg says individuals who depend on legal aid are especially hard hit by economic downturns.

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Mask or No Mask? Debate Continues Amid Coronavirus Outbreak

BY Spectrum News Staff

NATIONWIDE - The Trump administration is warning this month will be especially rough with the number of coronavirus cases.

Officials say social distancing is helping slow the spread of the disease, but it's not enough to stop it in its tracks.

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Feeling Sluggish? Try this.

BY Alexa Maslowski

CLEVELAND, Ohio — During a crisis, it’s important that we focus on the basics: eating and sleeping. Those two things will impact every other part of our well-being.

Cleveland Clinic Psychologist and New York Times Bestselling Author Dr. Susan Albers says we need to create new homeostasis during social distancing.

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Defense Soap Helping to Combat Coronavirus

BY Enrique Correa

VERMILLION, Ohio — A Vermilion soap company is helping people fight the coronavirus with their special disinfectant.

“Anything that fights corona is just going through the roof right now,” said Guy Sako, owner of Defense Soap.

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How Much Help Small Businesses Will Need During Pandemic

BY Taylor Popielarz

WASHINGTON, D.C. — So many of Ohio’s 950,000 small businesses are struggling to survive right now because of the coronavirus.

Capitol Hill took note last week, with lawmakers passing a relief package that includes billions in loans that could be forgiven.

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DeWine’s Stance on Releasing Prisoners Unchanged

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — According to the Office of the Ohio Public Defender, Ohio prisons are currently about 1/3 over capacity and their infirmaries are nowhere near equipped to handle an outbreak.

Last week, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine intimated that he wouldn’t let prisoners out, saying that they have just as much of a chance contracting the virus on the outside that they do on the inside.

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Here's Why Ventilators Are a Crucial Tool in Fighting COVID-19

BY Erin Billups

About 1 in 4 patients hospitalized for COVID-19 are admitted to the ICU.

In many of the most severe cases, patients develop ARDS or Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome - an inflammatory reaction to the virus - where fluid fills the lungs, preventing oxygen from getting to the brain and other crucial organs. A ventilator is what keeps these patients alive.

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Timely Legal Tips for Small Business Owners

BY Karlynn Wells

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Legal expert Rob Glickman of McCarthy, Lebit, Crystal & Liffman, says he plans on assisting small business owners in identifying and navigating through the changes and challenges they're facing due to COVID-19.

Glickman says when it comes to the pandemic, questions regarding the impact on small businesses are being answered each day, like what is actually considered a small business? “A small businesses is defined based on the industry it’s in and the category of business that it’s in, but right online. At the Small Business Association, you can do it, you can look right up and see whether or not you qualify as a small business, and that varies based on your number of employees and your gross revenues,” Glickman said. He says every small business qualifies for some type of assistance to help meet their financial obligations. “You have been ordered by the government to shut your doors. and normally, if a government action prevents your performance, that renders the defense of impossibility available to you,” Glickman said. So what aid is available to them? “There are an awful lot of resources that are available to them and more coming online and available to them every day through both state and federal agencies. Everyone right now, especially those businesses that are subject to closure in Ohio that aren't what the government has deemed a necessary business, are worried about their rent, they’re worried about taxes, they're worried about employees, and resources are out there for them,” he said. The Small Business Administration is offering essentially disaster loans up to $2 million that they can apply for at a relatively low interest rate, 3.75 percent for businesses, 2.75 percent for nonprofits. Those loans can be used to tide them over during this period. They can be retained over 30 years.” Glickman said. What options do businesses have to postpone various financial obligations, such as lease payments?

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NEO Sports Trainer Provides Virtual Outlet for Athletes

BY Rachele Mongiovi

TALLMADGE, Ohio — For many people, springtime symbolizes baseball and softball season, but due to COVID-19, many schools and leagues have cancelled or postponed the season. That means thousands of athletes are without an outlet during this stressful time.

A Northeast Ohio training coach is now providing that outlet virtually.

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No Travel Restrictions Currently in Place in Ohio

BY Enrique Correa

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Some states are now taking precautions regarding people traveling outside of the New York area.

New York has become of the epicenter of the coronavirus crisis in America, with nearly half of the COVID-19 deaths coming from the tri-state area.

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Cooper's Hawk Feeds Employees During Pandemic

BY Katie Kapusta

CINCINNATI, Ohio— It’s a difficult time for many to make ends meet, especially those in the service industry. Restaurants across the state have had to become very creative in how to keep their employees afloat during this difficult time. One of those restaurants is Cooper’s Hawk. They’re making sure each of their employees has a warm meal each night.

When restaurants in Ohio were ordered to shut down dining rooms, thousands of people lost their main source of income.

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Beachwood Encourages Residents to Decorate Windows During Quarantine

BY Ryan Schmelz

BEACHWOOD, Ohio — A city in Ohio has come up with a creative way to say "thank you" to first responders, welcome in spring and give families an activity to do while they have to be at home.

The Bystroms are like many families across Ohio right now — they’re stuck at home. "It’s been pretty fun," said the family. "We’ve been finding ways to keep ourselves entertained. We’ve been doing a little fitness competition to see who can work the hardest!" said Grady Bystrom. They discovered an interesting activity when the city of Beachwood, on social media, challenged neighbors to get creative — which Missy, the mom, accepted. "I still like to pretend they’re in kindergarten and second grade!" said Missy Bystrom. The Bystroms’ window shows a globe, surrounded by everyone still working right now. It includes doctors, firefighters, police officers, mail workers and journalists. It also has "Thank You" written in different languages from across the world. "We hope that they take away that they’re an invaluable component of our community here and without them, we’d probably be at a bit of a loss," said Spencer Bystrom. The Bystroms aren’t alone. Beachwood’s Facebook page has several festive windows with inspirational ways of saying thank you, and for this family, it’s a bonding experience. "Even though initially they were a little bit like, ‘are you serious mom?’ you know, in the end, we ended up having a really fun time. And I think it’s something to say that a junior in high school and a freshman in college can sit down with their mom and, you know, do something like this and have some fun. It’s a good little thing for anybody to do at any age.

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Avoiding Information Overload While You're the Teacher at Home

BY Tonisha Johnson

OHIO — With so many companies providing free resources these days, it can be overwhelming for parents helping their kids to continue to learn at home.

Educators say the key to finding the right resources while avoiding information overload and unexpected charges, is to ask the professionals and keep it simple.

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FDA Green Lights Battelle Plan for Mass Mask Sterilization

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The FDA has finally given the approval for the Ohio-based company Battelle to begin sterilizing face marks for those on the front line.

There was a lag to this approval, involving a lot of bureaucratic red tape, but Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted says it took the governor calling up the president, putting his feet to the fire, and making this a priority.

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Interactive Map: Where Has COVID-19 Spread?

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 9:06 AM ET Mar. 31, 2020

As the world works to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Johns Hopkins University has compiled an interactive map to show the number of cases throughout the world, as well as their locations. The map is updated throughout the day.



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Ohio K-12 Schools Will Remain Closed Until May 1

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The biggest news to come out of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s press conference Monday is that the three-week extended break for schools is being extended even further.

Schools will remain closed until at least May 1, but the governor did not rule out the possibility that students could be out for the remainder of the school year.

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INTERACTIVE: How COVID-19 Could Affect Your Hospitals

BY Christie Zizo
UPDATED 1:08 PM ET Mar. 30, 2020

ORLANDO, Fla. — Are the hospitals in your area able to withstand a COVID-19 outbreak?

Data models compiled by a Harvard group show what hospitals could be in for, depending on the severity of an outbreak over the next 18 months, if they make no changes to capacity.

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Churches Create New Ways to Worship Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

BY Rachele Mongiovi

SUMMIT COUNTY, Ohio — Communities across the country are adapting to a "new normal" amid the COVID-19 pandemic, including churches and religious organizations.

At Tallmadge United Methodist Church, Pastor Scott Low has found a new way to reach his parishioners. He's offering Sunday worship through a drive-in church service. "We have lots of people coming in, lots of people on social media saying what a great way to reach out to people, especially now. Even though we're not together because we're separated by our cars, we're still together," said Pastor Low. Those who attend the drive-in worship can sit back and relax from the comfort of their cars and listen to the word of God through their radio. "The word of God is powerful, as we pray together and we hear words of encouragement and remind each other of the promises that God has for us, it keeps us on track as we're going through some times that are so hard for people," said Pastor Low. In Hudson, Christ Community Chapel is reaching their followers in a different way. Pastor Joe Coffey is focused on virtual church services to reach his more than 4,000 church members with the click of a mouse. "I think that maybe it's more important now than ever, I think a lot of people are feeling the ground shift underneath them and so a lot of people are turning to God and need the reassurance of their faith, a chance to worship even though we call it “gathering while scattered," said Pastor Coffey. Pastor Coffey says they've seen an uptick in followers. "Our attendance virtually is actually bigger than it was when we were gathering. I miss seeing people, it's different to speak just to a camera." As both Summit County churches adapt to a new way of worship, together they share the same message. "It can be discouraging, especially when we are closed off from each other and alone and so my hope is that you might build relationships with each other even beyond online and really hold onto what's important at this time," said Pastor Low.

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West Side Market Open for Business

BY Enrique Correa

CLEVELAND, Ohio — While many Ohio businesses have been forced to shut down over the last few weeks, a Cleveland landmark is keeping its doors open.

Cleveland's West Side Market remains open and is "fully stocked."

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FDA Approves Battelle Mask Sterilization System

BY Ryan Schmelz

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Governor Mike DeWine made a plea to the Food and Drug Administration Sunday.

"We do not have enough masks," DeWine said at the press conference. “We have been waiting and waiting and waiting.” The FDA fully approved a Critical Care Decontamination System developed by Columbus-based Battelle. The governor believes it will go a long way toward keeping health care workers safe. "We developed a technology at Battelle that showed we could take N95 respirators and that we could clean them with a concentrated hydrogen peroxide vapor for a period of several hours and basically decontaminate them for lots of things, including bugs that are worse than COVID-19," said Battelle CEO Lou Von Thaer. Battelle says it has two machines ready to go in Ohio, one more on Long Island, and several other set to be deployed across the country. DeWine said he had a good conversation with President Donald Trump about the issue. President Trump brought up the conversation at his press conference on Sunday. "As soon as I heard from Mike today, I got involved and the FDA is now involved and we're trying to get a fast approval for the sterilization of masks. That would be a tremendous difference. It will be really helpful," said Trump. The CEO of Battelle says masks can be cleaned up to 20 times. He also says the company can start sending sterilized masks out on Tuesday.

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Ohio Company Changing Gears to Help Protect Healthcare Workers

BY Spectrum News Staff

BRYAN, Ohio — Daavlin, a company in northwest Ohio, is among those forging the way to address the need to help keep healthcare workers who treat coronavirus patients safe.

Daavlin's headquarters and manufacturing facility are in Bryan, Ohio. That's in Williams County.

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COTA, Donatos Team Up TO Thank Transit Employees

BY MaryLee Melendez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — As we've heard from Dr. Amy Acton, not all heroes wear capes.

Today the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA), along with Donatos Pizza, took time to honor the heroes working in public transit during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Ohio Man Who Escaped Wuhan Compares Coronavirus Reactions

BY Lindsay Oliver

COLUMBUS, Ohio — As the U.S. continues to see coronavirus cases explode in numbers, Wuhan, China, where this outbreak began, is now seeing things start to calm down.

Now, one Ohioan who escaped the outbreak in Wuhan to return back to central Ohio, finds the virus at his doorstep once again.

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Mid-Semester Changes to Learning Cause Stress for Some Students

BY Tonisha Johnson

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Thousands of students across the State of Ohio made the complete switch to virtual more than a week ago and now college students are speaking up about the impact it's having on the ability to move forward in their majors and careers.

With all classes here at Ohio State online now, some students say it's become a struggle and even stressful, as things keep changing, leaving them uncertain about whether they'll be admitted into certain majors. Protecting her roommate, Ohio State University student Kennedy Kelly walked across campus to meet outside and share what her first week of online classes have been like. So far, she says with the switch to mostly lectures and projects, it's made her more disciplined, forced her not to procrastinate and caused her to plan more, so she can get her work done.

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Wright State Donates Valuable PPE To Premier Health

BY Tino Bovenzi

Wright State Donates Valuable PPE To Premier Health Preview Text: Wright State donated 80 boxes of surgical masks, 145 boxes of gloves, 20 boxes of gowns and more to Premier Health.

Social Text: They donated PPE equipment meant for students.

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Construction Continues for Major Canton Project

BY Ryan Schmelz

CANTON, Ohio —"This project’s vitally important to the city. I mean, it’s our keynote project for downtown development, and it’s also part of one of our biggest projects for what was passed sometime ago, Issue 13, for our economic development downtown,” said Don Angus, director of planning for the city of Canton.

With a price tag of more than $12 million, the project is being completed in partnership with the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

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$2.2 Trillion Coronavirus Relief Package Becomes Law

BY Taylor Popielarz

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A $2.2 trillion relief package to combat the coronavirus and help the economy has been signed into law by President Trump after the U.S. House of Representatives passed it Friday afternoon.

Of Ohio’s 16 U.S. House members, 12 returned to Washington on Friday to make sure the massive relief package was passed without further delay. “We needed to make sure that the American economy continues to be the strongest economy on the globe, and it is, but it’s obviously tough right now,” said Rep. Steve Chabot (R, 1st Congressional District). "So it was an important thing to be here.” Some of Ohio’s members, like Chabot and Rep. Dave Joyce (R, 14th Congressional District) got on nearly-empty airplanes to be here for the vote. Other members drove in. Kentucky Republican Rep. Thomas Massie tried to delay passage of the legislation by demanding all House members return to D.C. to vote in-person, but enough showed up to override him and push the relief package through. “The bill wasn’t perfect by any means, but if it unites our country and gets us moving forward, it’s something that I think, hopefully, will provide some future benefits as we move forward,” Rep. Joyce said. This “Phase 3” coronavirus package is the largest one-time spending bill in U.S. history; and it comes after Congress passed “Phase 1” and “Phase 2” packages worth a combined $108 billion. Here’s some of what’s included in the latest one:

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DeWine Says Ohio Needs Two to Three Times More Hospital Beds

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — “Within about two weeks —and we’re continuing to see it go up — but within about two weeks, it’s going to kick in much harder, and we’re going to really start getting hit very hard in our hospitals and our hospital admissions,” said Governor Mike DeWine.

Governor Mike DeWine says despite our best efforts, when the peak infections hit —which could mean 8,000 new cases a day —we’re going to need two to three times more hospital beds than the state currently has.

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Supporting Your Hometown From Home with Destination Cleveland

BY Karlynn Wells

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Destination Cleveland’s Emily Lauer says the goal of “Be a Tourist in Your Hometown Weekend" is to encourage local residents to get out and explore “The Land."

“We would have had activities and activations all around the area in partnership with so many of our great activities and experiences here in Cleveland,” Lauer says. But now, the convention and visitors bureau is facing the reality that Clevelanders have no choice but to stay home due to COVID-19 precautions.

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High School Senior Throws Impromptu Graduation

BY Tonisha Johnson

GEORGETOWN, Ohio — Liz Meranda has been waiting four years to walk across the stage at Georgetown High School to get her high school diploma. But when she found out the coronavirus would force schools to close and leave graduation in question, she saw her final day before the three-week break as a chance to have what she calls her “last hoorah.” After all, once she came back from break, she'd be graduating soon.

The 17-year-old pulled out her cap and gown and tried it on, hoping it wouldn’t be her last time doing so.

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Elyria Schools Making Sure Students Don't Go Hungry

BY Enrique Correa

ELYRIA, Ohio — The Elyria City School District is making sure its students will not go hungry during this uncertain time amid the pandemic.

There was long line of cars at prospect elementary in Elyria, with people patiently waiting while free groceries were loaded into their cars.

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Miami County Public Health Provides Update On COVID-19 Outbreak in Troy

BY Tino Bovenzi

TROY, Ohio — Miami County Public Health is reporting one new confirmed coronavirus cases, a staff member of Koester Pavilion nursing home — The initial source of the outbreak.

The new case makes 7 total staff members infected with COVID-19 — one at SpringMeade, and six at Koester. Miami County Health Commissioner Dennis Propes said he’s actually encouraged by the progress being made in containing the outbreak despite the newly confirmed case. “As far as new residents, we have not received any new positive cases, nor have there been any new hospitalizations as of today, which is a positive,” he said. “I think we’re moving in the right direction with this particular outbreak.” However, he said they are in no way out of the woods as for containing this outbreak. “It’s not unusual to see secondary spikes,” Propes said. “We haven’t seen that yet. And we hope not too. I think, I’m hoping, we are hoping the control measures at the facilities have put in place and have been recommended will prevent that.” But a big reason perhaps why there aren’t many new cases is because they are no longer actively testing for the virus at either facility — simply awaiting existing tests to be processed. “It’s considered an outbreak, we know it’s there,” Propes said. “If anybody’s displaying symptoms, if anybody is symptomatic, they’re being treated as they’re a probable case. So the course of action would not change whether we test them or not.” In fact, people in Troy cannot be tested within the city because there are no more tests available. If anyone needs testing they have to visit the University of Dayton drive-through testing site — nearly 30 miles away. There is also increased cause for concern for the safety of those closely involved with the two facilities, not only for the residents, but for the nurses as well — who Propes said are working with a critically low supply of personal protective equipment (PPE). “We, as well as the state EMA, have been working all the channels that we know to try to alleviate that need,” Propes said. “But there’s a shortage worldwide on PPE.” Premier Health, who owns oversees operation for both sites, issued this statement in response to our question regarding PPE shortages for staff: “Our staff members are wearing masks for all patients – and gowns in accordance with public health guidelines – and we continue to ask our employees to take the necessary precautions as they care for residents and patients. We continue to work closely with local and state health officials, in addition to following CDC guidelines. Our clinical and support teams are well-prepared to treat patients with COVID-19 while ensuring the safety of our patients and staff. We have the personal protective equipment that we need right now. There is ongoing conversation about potential future demand and whether there will be enough such equipment during later stages of the pandemic. Our focus has been ensuring that we do not overuse PPE outside of recommended situations to ensure we can maintain an adequate supply if and when a higher number of cases challenges our health care system. Many people are working proactively to address that long-term need, including ways to extend the life of our PPE equipment.” Ohio Director of Health Dr. Amy Acton said the state has been working directly with nursing homes providing guidance to assist in handling the outbreak. She said those in nursing homes and long-term care are the most vulnerable, which makes it a very difficult situation. But she praises the nurses who are sacrificing their own health potentially during the outbreak. “To the employees that are working so hard to keep the residents safe you are definitely our heroes,” Dr. Acton said. As for trying to pinpoint the source of the outbreak, Miami County Public Health has not been able to do so. Propes said so far they don’t see anything that show’s Premier Health is at fault for the outbreak’s spread through not one, but two sites. “We haven’t seen anything that would lead us to believe they’ve done anything incorrectly or against protocol or recommendations,” Propes said. “Everything that we’ve gotten from them, everything we’ve seen from them, they’ve been doing things correctly. I think this is just a sad truth what this virus is.” For now, Propes said all information he’s receiving from Premier Health leads him to believe the staff and residents are adapting to the situation, and handling it as best as they can. “The staff is holding up good they’re holding up well,” he said. “The residents are upbeat given the situation. Their understanding of what’s going on. It’s a tough time for everyone, all indications from the from the facility is they’re doing well.” Moving forward, Miami County Public Health is hopeful and encouraged by the efforts of everyone involved to contain the spread of the virus. Only time will tell where we go from here. Spectrum News 1 will continue to provide updates as we follow this story.

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Coronavirus in Rural Ohio

BY Olivia Wile

OHIO — Rural areas have seen far fewer coronavirus cases than cities. But that doesn’t mean less populated areas are immune to the greatest public health crisis in a century. And given the lack of medical facilities, the threat in rural areas is real.

The coronavirus will eventually reach places like Hardin County, Ohio, if it hasn’t already. Cases have been confirmed in counties north, east, and south of here. While Hardin County does have one hospital in Kenton, many rural areas do not. An outbreak would quickly overwhelm the whole region’s medical facilities.

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How to Keep Coronavirus From Crushing Your Wallet

BY Enrique Correa

ELYRIA, Ohio — While details are being worked out regarding the nation's coronavirus stimulus package, many are trying figure out how to manage bills before and after a stimulus check arrives.

The $2 trillion coronavirus aid and relief stimulus aims to help families get through this health crisis. However, will it be enough money to pay rent, credit cards, utilities and other bills?

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Coping with Anxiety and Stress in the Age of Coronavirus

BY Erin Billups
UPDATED 9:05 PM ET Mar. 26, 2020

There is so much uncertainty right now because the COVID-19 pandemic is completely unprecedented here in the U.S. Local and state health officials are working to strike a balance between what is known, unknown and calming fears. But the constant stream of information and rising case counts of the new coronavirus are fueling our collective anxieties.

Spectrum News National Health Reporter Erin Billups sat down with Columbia University Clinical Psychologist Anne Marie Albano, PhD, who is also the co-clinical director of the University’s Youth Anxiety Clinic. Dr. Albano shares some thoughts and expert advice on how to cope in the midst of an unprecedented global health crisis.

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Peak Infection Could Mean 6K to 8K New Cases Daily

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — At Ohio Governor Mike DeWine’s press conference Thursday, we learned that nationally a record 3.3 million people have filed for unemployment.

In Ohio, were getting our first look at how many are out of work as a result of coronavirus here in the state.

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Couple Postpones Wedding Due To Coronavirus Pandemic

BY Katie Kapusta

It’s supposed to be the happiest time of your life planning a wedding. But for many brides and grooms-to-be that planned to get married this spring they’re having to switch up their plans.

This time of year usually begins busy wedding season. And event centers like the Bell Event Center in downtown Cincinnati usually is busy every single weekend. But they’ve had to reschedule all of their weddings from now until mid may because of the coronavirus.

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UC Grad Develops New Test for COVID-19

BY Katie Kapusta

Jay Han graduated from the University of Cincinnati with his PHD in 2006. He’s now using his electrical engineering background to help develop the latest in testing for the coronavirus at Mico Biomed here in Cincinnati.

“We didn’t know that this pandemic would happen,: Han said. "Then after a few weeks we were like this is going to be debilitating.”

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Sinclair Donates Needed Medical Supplies and Equipment to Local Hospitals

BY Tino Bovenzi

DAYTON, Ohio- In response to the expected surge of COVID-19 cases in Ohio and to meet the critical need for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and medical supplies, Sinclair has donated more than 11,000 individual PPE items and over 500 greatly needed medical supply items, to local hospitals. This college is also preparing to transfer nine ventilators, four cardiac monitors and an additional number of respiratory units to area hospitals. Dr. Steve Johnson, President of Sinclair College, said, “Our mission is the same as it was when David A. Sinclair, first offered education to local citizens in 1887, “To find the need and endeavor to meet it.” When the needs of our community change, Sinclair responds accordingly. These are challenging times and we’re glad to be able to provide our local hospitals with the critical medical supplies and equipment needed during this time.” “The leadership team at Sinclair have been working together around the clock, every day, over the past few weeks, following directives from the Governor, national, state and local leaders," Johnson said. "Our goal is to help 'flatten the curve,' and we are committed to keep our students and this community safe. These are difficult times and all of us at Sinclair are prepared to do whatever it takes to get through this.” Sinclair is recognized as a local and national leader in delivering high-quality and affordable higher education. One of the oldest and best-known community colleges in the nation, Sinclair was founded in 1887 by David A. Sinclair and is a board member of the prestigious League for Innovation in the Community College.

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American Teacher Recalls Six Weeks of Isolation in China

BY Dennis Biviano

QINGDAO, China —Emily Tanner is an American-born English teacher currently living in Qingdao, a city about 11 hours from the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan China.

The city of 9 million first experienced a lockdown at the end of January, just as Tanner was returning from a trip home to Florida during the Chinese New Year.

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Gadgets To Help Seniors During Social Distancing

BY Lindsay Oliver

COLUMBUS, Ohio– When it comes to protecting the elderly from the coronavirus, visitation from family can be dangerous, which is why the state of Ohio has restricted visitation to nursing homes. And While we may not be able to be with our elderly loved ones in person, maintaining communication is more critical now than ever.

We spoke with an expert regarding some technology to help us stay in touch.

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OHSAA Cancels Winter Tournaments

BY Spectrum News Staff

COLUMBUS, Ohio — After hanging in limbo for two weeks, the Ohio High School Athletic Association (OHSAA) officially canceled the remaining winter championships on Thursday.

The events were initially postponed indefinitely back on March 12, just minutes away from the beginning of the girls state basketball tournament. That held up girls and boys basketball, team wrestling and ice hockey from being completed.

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Donation Points, Call Centers to Help Physically and Financially

BY Ryan Schmelz

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Cuyahoga County has plans to help people who have lost jobs due to COVID-19 closures. Officials are also asking the public to pitch in with supplies for our health care first responders.

Those on the front lines battling coronavirus, like Cuyahoga County Medical Director Dr. Heidi Gullett, shared a sobering reality of how it’s affecting her family. "We made the difficult decision to live separately right now. We are one of thousands of health care families who are making these decisions every day. If my husband becomes sick and I’m still living in the same home, and our children are living in the same home, we then have a higher risk for this infection, and we become under quarantine," said Dr. Gullett. The county is receiving numerous calls a day. People are worried about physical health and their money. "Within the first few days of the lockdown, we were up to quadrupling the calls. But since then, things have leveled off, but we are still averaging 6,000 calls a week, which is about double the average number of calls we receive in a week,” said Nancy Mendez, United Way of Greater Cleveland's vice president of community impact. She says people who call 211 are asking for assistance with food and meal help, income, housing, utility assistance and health care. She says the 24/7 service can be helpful while waiting to receive unemployment benefits. “Government is overwhelmed at this point with the number of people calling in, so where our 211 help link plays a role is that for a temporary basis, these individuals could find a meal, find food, until they can eventually have those government and federal dollars.” Healthcare workers are also getting some backup. Residents are bringing supplies that hospital workers need must have to fight and prevent COVID-19 to the donation site. "If you look at a place like New York, they are way short of protective equipment, and it’s becoming catastrophic. We here in Cleveland right now, our hospitals are doing okay with protective equipment, but we’re going to need a lot more," said County Executive Armond Buddish. United Way of Greater Cleveland has expanded the amount of counties it serves. It now serves Allen, Belmont, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lawrence, Medina, Ross Coshocton, Crawford, Darke, Erie, Huron, Van Wert and Wyandot.

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Together/Alone: In Virus-Stricken Milan, a Prayer and a New Outlook

BY Josh Robin
UPDATED 10:12 AM ET Mar. 26, 2020

NOTE: This story is part of “Together/Alone,” a column from Spectrum News Chief National Political Reporter Josh Robin that explores life during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The other day in Milan, just as Italy surpassed China in the Coronavirus death count, a priest posted a prayer on the door of a small church. It was addressed to Sebastian, the sainted protector against the plague.

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Pandemic Generates High Anxiety for Voters, High Approval for Governors Handling Crisis

BY Spectrum News Staff

COLUMBUS, OHIO – Ohio voters polled by Baldwin Wallace University's Community Research Institute are reacting very favorably to Gov. Mike DeWine's approach to managing the state's COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak.

The university says the results of their Great Lakes Poll "offer a snapshot of public opinion in four key Midwestern states caught in the midst of the fear and uncertainty caused by the coronavirus pandemic."

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Keeping the Census in Mind Amid COVID-19 Changes

BY Karlynn Wells

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Dr. Sarah Ronis is director of the center for child health and policy for University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital in Cleveland. She says besides social distancing and excellent hand hygiene, a crucial action everyone can take to lessen the impact of COVID-19 is completing a 2020 U.S. Census form.

“When we first heard that the time had come to keep kids home from school, one of my first thoughts was, oh my goodness. Many of my children that I take care of in my practice rely on their school for breakfast or lunch. Those school lunch and breakfast programs are funded based on census data. And the resources to help support them while they’re home, like SNAP and TANF, are organized by census data, so it touches everything,” Ronis said. She says she understands the life-altering effects COVID-19 has had on lives and livelihoods and adds that the 10 minutes it takes to fill out a census form could affect the next ten years of your life. “For every person in Ohio that is counted in the census, Ohio receives somewhere around $3,200 per year in federal dollars. There is a big picture of past this moment, and that we have a limited opportunity right now to make sure that we're all being counted and that we all have access to the resources we're going to need in the summer, in the fall, next year and five years from now,” said Ronis. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, data collected in the 2020 Census will inform the distribution of more than $675 billion in federal funds to states and communities each year. Ben Holbert is the mayor of Woodmere Village in Cuyahoga County. He was a regional supervisor in for the 2010 Census and now as mayor, Holbert says he's making sure everyone in his community is counted. “When I get ready to fill out grants for the Village of Woodmere, sometimes those documents will require a population count. Wherever you are, on April 1, 2020, you are to fill out the census form. And I have a copy of mine right here,” he said. This year, Holbert has also focused most of his attention on reaching out to “hard-to-count” populations. “We have a whole homeless population, so in the past when we sent out a census form, obviously if they don't have an address or residence where they could go to get that form, they're not going to be counted,” said Holbert. “Another group that you might not at first suspect are senior citizens, because sometimes when the mail comes to their home, they're not quite sure what the document means, and sometimes it's a little bit difficult for them to be able to fill it out... people who live in apartment complexes, because at times they’re transient, they move back and forth from one place to another,” Holbert said. Paper forms were mailed to certain areas, such as those with low internet use or where large numbers of senior citizens live. The Census Bureau has also launched a telephone-based census option. But, this is the first year the bureau is relying primarily on web-based data collection.

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Should Congress Start Voting Remotely Because Of Coronavirus?

BY Taylor Popielarz

WASHINGTON, D.C. — It’s a question being asked more and more here in Washington as the coronavirus spreads: Is it safe for members of Congress to continue traveling here to legislate?

Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) doesn’t think so. “Whether it’s an act of terrorism or whether it’s bioterrorism or whether it’s a virus like this one, there may be instances going forward where Congress cannot or should not gather,” he said in an interview on Tuesday. “And in those rare cases, we ought to have the ability, in a safe and secure way, to be able to vote remotely.” Portman and Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Illinois) have introduced a resolution that would let Senate leadership allow remote voting for up to 30 days. If another 30 days were needed after that, the Senate would vote to renew the resolution.

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NEO Tech Companies Create Digital COVID-19 Survey

BY Rachele Mongiovi

AKRON, OHIO — Hospitals nationwide are overwhelmed with coronavirus patients and testing sites continue to see long lines of people. In an effort to reduce those numbers, a new online survey is up and running for people to assess their symptoms at home.

The digital survey was created by two Northeast Ohio tech companies — GeneratorWorks in Akron and SmartDocMD in Cleveland. The online survey asks people a series of questions, including symptoms and potential Covid-19 exposure. People will then find out where they land on a risk scale —red being the most at risk. "This survey, SecurePass, is being delivered through our healthcare community so we can directly connect with those patients that may be at a higher level, at a red level," said Blake Squires, CEO of GeneratorWorks. "Testing has been slow to roll out and what it does is provide the data to let us know really what's going on out there. It's not just about understanding from a patient side, but being able to prioritize and triage these folks remotely, which is key." SecurePass uses clinical algorithms that combine CDC guidelines for risk assessment, patient symptoms and medical commodities. Patients can request to take the survey online and they will be linked up with their healthcare provider before being issued the survey. It takes just a few minutes to complete and is available to healthcare providers nationwide. Squires says the survey will help ease the burden of our healthcare system and testing sites and keep those with the lowest risk at home. "There is no other tool that we know of that gets into the clinical aspects to provide decision support for healthcare professionals. It will absolutely help our infrastructure and our hospital systems that are being overwhelmed," said Squires. To request a survey, click here.

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Pregnancy During COVID-19 Pandemic

BY Karlynn Wells
UPDATED 4:00 PM ET Mar. 25, 2020

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Cleveland Clinic's Dr. Tosin Goje says each day health officials are learning more about effects the corona virus has on pregnant women.

What they know now is that the virus has not been passed from mother to fetus during the pregnancy.

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What Companies Are Hiring During the Coronavirus Crisis?

BY Spectrum News Staff

OHIO- While the coronavirus pandemic has caused many businesses to close and layoff workers, some companies are hiring thousands of new employees to meet a surge in demand.

Companies such as Walmart, UPS, Amazon, and others have all said they need new workers now.

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Taking a Closer Look at Coronavirus Symptoms and Impact on Children

BY Erin Billups
UPDATED 1:58 PM ET Mar. 25, 2020

Scientists around the globe are rapidly trying to gain insights into the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the coronavirus. Here’s some information on two new studies of note:

The first, is the largest study done on kids, focusing on 2,143 pediatric patients who either tested positive with COVID-19 or were suspected of having it. While most kids are less likely to experience severe illness with COVID-19 than adults - it doesn’t mean kids don’t fall ill to the virus. Here are some of the findings, published in the journal Pediatrics:

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Coronavirus Launches Yoga Community Into The Digital Age

BY Sophia Constantine

COLUMBUS, Ohio — While the COVID-19 outbreak is forcing gyms, fitness centers and studios across the country to temporarily close, the yoga community is taking the challenge and focusing on growth.

Modo Yoga has about 75 locations worldwide. Their Columbus location is among those with their doors closed.

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University Hospitals Begins COVID-19 Anti-Viral Clinical Trials

BY Alexa Maslowski

CLEVELAND, Ohio — University Hospitals has begun clinical trials to test an anti-viral drug to combat COVID-19. The Hospital’s research team is among the first in the nation to test the drug.

“It's a good thing, I think it gives our patients at UH and people from the Cleveland area a good option, very promising option to be able to get better faster from COVID-19, and notice I didn't say be cured, because you know the virus, like any other virus, at some point if it doesn't kill you, you're going to get better,” said Dr. Grace McComsey, who is the vice president of research and the associate chief scientific officer at UH. McComsey says the drug, Remdesivir, is the first antiviral that shows a lot of promise, specifically for COVID-19.

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Dayton Domino’s Sharing Profits With Employees During Coronavirus Pandemic

BY Tino Bovenzi

DAYTON, Ohio — The Dayton Domino’s franchise is changing its business model — sharing profits with its employees over the next 12 weeks.

Pizza is in high demand right now, and this Dayton Domino’s franchise has 21 stores, but Franchisee Tristan Koehler has implemented a new policy that’s going to share profits with employees — giving each one in his company a much-needed raise during the coronavirus pandemic. “We wanted to do something to show our team members that we are in this together with them,” Koehler said. The franchise announced the decision via Facebook, stating all their employees should see a big raise of $2-$3 per hour, depending on how busy they are.

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Enforcing The Stay at Home Order

BY Enrique Correa

OHIO- Police departments in Ohio will be enforcing the governor’s “stay at home” order; however, it will likely be more about education rather than punishment, as officers adapt to the new rules.

Police around Ohio have plans to enforce the state’s stay at home order.

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Central Ohio Coffeehouse Donates Coffee to Healthcare Workers

BY Dennis Biviano

COLUMBUS, Ohio — While The Roosevelt Coffeehouse lies dormant in downtown Columbus, workers are busy at the company's warehouse fulfilling a rush of online orders.

When the quarantine took effect, the coffee shop decided to give thanks to our brave healthcare professionals by telling customers if they buy a bag of any of their coffee —the company will donate and hand-deliver a bag to a healthcare professional for free.

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Teacher Tackles Working From Home

BY Tonisha Johnson

LITTLETOWN, Ohio — As parents have made the transition to homeschooling their children during this coronavirus outbreak, many teachers are doing their best to keep up with the demand of k-12 online lessons.

Clear Fork Middle School teacher Stacie White teaches math. In the days leading up to her school closing down she crammed like a college student might for a final exam, vetting resources, apps and platforms to prepare for now.

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Photographers Get Creative, Do Porch Portraits

BY Katie Kapusta
UPDATED 8:30 AM ET Mar. 25, 2020

Businesses and entrepreneurs have to be a little more creative to keep afloat during this time. That includes local photographers who are struggling after many wedding and newborn photo sessions have been canceled.

For many of us we’re stuck inside all day- trying to find something to pass the time. One idea? Porch portraits. Local photographers are encouraging couples and families to get outside while they shoot pictures from a safe social distance.

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DeWine Prioritizes Health Over Business

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — President Donald Trump is eager to get America back to work, with talk of being back in business by Easter.

Here in Ohio, Governor Mike DeWine says health is our top priority.

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Coronavirus and the Age Factor

BY Erin Billups

From the crush of college spring breakers flooding Florida’s beaches last week, to the numerous pick up basketball games spotted in New York City parks, it’s clear many young adults feel immune to the global pandemic sickening hundreds of thousands. But they are not.

The anecdotal stories coming out of emergency rooms inundated with coronavirus patients, and the raw data being compiled by government agencies, paint a clear picture - that people of all ages are at risk.

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Food Distributors Cope With Restaurant Closures

BY Ryan Schmelz

MENTOR, Ohio — The closing of bars and restaurants is hitting not just the restaurants, but those who provide the food supply.

Euclid Fish is open for business, as it has been for several decades, long before John Young joined the family business.

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#WineWithDeWine Trending on Social Media During News Conferences

BY Lindsay Oliver

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Stress and anxiety are high for many, as our nation and the Buckeye State navigate uncharted waters known as the coronavirus.

So, Ohioans have taken to social media to lighten the mood — doing a virtual toast around the state to Ohio Governor Mike DeWine.

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Ohio Denim Maker Switches to Mask Production

BY Dennis Biviano

FREDERICKTOWN, Ohio — We first introduced you to Zach Myers just two months ago. The Fredericktown man, and owner founder of Zace Brand is just one of a half dozen in the United States still producing denim.

But oh, how times have changed since then, not only for Myers, and small business owners alike, but all of us.

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Teacher Challenged with Getting Lupus Drug Also Used for COVID-19

BY Tonisha Johnson

OHIO — Ohioans living with diseases like Lupus and Rheumatoid Arthritis won't have to worry about getting the medicine they need most. That's because Ohio Governor Mike DeWine issued an executive order on Sunday to stop the stockpiling of anti-malarial drugs that are also being used to treat COVID-19 patients as part of a trial.

Practicing social distancing at home, eighth grade math teacher Stacie White does what she can to manage living with Lupus. That includes taking a drug called Hydroxychloroquine, also known as Plaquenil.

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Tax Day Moved, Budget Cuts Ahead

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio Governor Mike DeWine is following in federal footsteps, announcing Monday that tax day will be pushed back, though no official date has been set.

"That would be up to the legislature, but I would think that we will align those two together," said DeWine.

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DeWine Puts Freeze on Government Hires as Cases Increase

BY Molly Martinez

COLUMBUS, Ohio — “I’m ordering an immediate hiring freeze in state government. For all of these, the only exception will be those who are directly involved in fighting the coronavirus, and for whatever we need to do that. That obviously takes priority,” said DeWine.

Governor Mike DeWine announced new freezes Monday — including a temporary hold on all state contract services.

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Evictions During Covid-19

BY Rachele Mongiovi

AKRON, Ohio- While Governor Mike DeWine has announced a stay at home order, there are many people who may face eviction during the coronavirus crisis.

Steven McGarrity, executive director of Community Legal Aid in Akron, says he has a client who is being forced to move out this week.

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Karrikin Spirits Making Hand Sanitizer to Fill Hygiene Void

BY Tino Bovenzi

FAIRFAX, Ohio — The coronavirus has stretched health and hygiene resources very thin across the board — and hand sanitizer still remains one of the most hard to find products. With their taproom and restaurant closed thanks to the coronavirus, Karrikin Spirits had to rethink their business model. So they decided to help more people than just themselves, by making hand sanitizer to fill a great need for people here in Ohio and across the country.

For a business that’s used to making beer and different types of alcohol, things quickly changed, as preventative measures to limit the spread of the coronavirus were implemented. Owner-Operator of Karrikin Eric Baumann and his partners quickly had to make a decision to help others in order to help themselves. “We had to shut down the majority of our operations with our restaurant and taproom,” Baumann said. “But that being said, we saw an opportunity in the fact that we’re an alcohol producer, and we can produce that alcohol instead of making spirits for people to buy, we’re now making spirits for hand sanitizer.” Making the shift was something they knew would instantly help so many people.

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Exchange Student Stuck in Limbo Amid Pandemic

BY Sheena Elzie

OHIO — This is the new normal for many families after the coronavirus — talking to each other through Skype, when all they want to do is wrap their arms around each other.

“We are all three at home, but I miss my son,” said Charo Jimenez, mother of exchange student Marcos Ortega.

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Matthew 25 Ministries Providing Valuable Supplies for 75 Organizations During Pandemic

BY Tino Bovenzi

BLUE ASH, Ohio- There’s a shortage of many supplies like N95 masks, that’s keeping first responders and hospitals from being safe while doing their jobs. But through many partnerships and years of preparation, Matthew 25 Ministries is stepping up to the plate to provide for many organizations.

All week long. Matthew 25 Ministries loaded up two skids full of supplies, like paper towels, disinfectant wipes, hand sanitizer, and provided them to health organizations and first responders. They are providing valuable supplies for approximately 90 organizations in the greater Cincinnati area.

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LDS Church Community Gives Back

BY Dennis Biviano

GROVEPORT, Ohio — Reynoldsburg resident Thomas Hartwell is one of 14 volunteers working 30 to 40 hour weeks at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ food pantry in Groveport.

Between the store and warehouse, the goal is to provide two weeks’ worth of food and household times to those in need.

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Community Coming Together From a Distance

BY Alexa Maslowski

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, Ohio —The city of University Heights is doing something a little different.

“I think it's great. I mean, a couple of my neighbors were just saying that they're meeting for the first time,” said Mike Sears, of University Heights. Every day at 6:30 p.m., they’re stepping outside to say hello — from a distance. “I think it's a great idea. I mean, so we come out to the park every weekend and meet neighbors and this has become a very social neighborhood for us and, you know, for people to be stuck in their homes, especially as the winter is starting to break and it's turning into spring, I think it's good to get people out and just to wave and say hello,” said Mike Hancock, of University Heights.

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DeWine Announces Stay-At-Home Order for Ohioans

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 10:45 AM ET Mar. 23, 2020

COLUMBUS, Ohio — During a press conference on Sunday afternoon, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced that Health Director Dr. Amy Acton has signed a “stay-at-home” order for Ohio.

The order allows exceptions, which include essential trips for supplies, walking the dog, and helping to take care of others.

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People Get Outside During Quarantine

BY Ryan Schmelz

CLEVELAND, Ohio — A stay-at-home order and sloppy weather in Northeast Ohio have been a combination of bad news, but being trapped inside can make you a little stir crazy.

As the waves crash down on Edgewater Beach just outside of downtown Cleveland, people take in the view as pets take in some new smells.

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Ohio Pie Shop Serves Up Comfort To Go

BY Enrique Correa

Update: Since the time this story was published, Spectrum News 1 has learned the bakery has now closed.

Amherst, Ohio — Mama Jo Homestyle Pies has been making delicious pies and other baked good for 26 years —and they are committed to making pies during these difficult times.

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Hilliard BBQ Joint Offers Free Kid's Meals

BY Chuck Ringwalt

HILLIARD, Ohio - In Central Ohio Legacy Smokehouse is giving out free lunches to children affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Co-owner Chad Smock said he's thankful that the community is finding ways to support his restaurant during these difficult times and he's happy to support them as well.

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Fighting Addiction In Isolation

BY Chuck Ringwalt

COLUMBUS, Ohio - As we continue to isolate ourselves, the coronavirus pandemic is affecting more and more of our lives. Many people are already in crisis as they battle addiction and social distancing is making it more difficult to maintain their sobriety.

The people in this article asked that they remain anonymous.

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Postponed Graduation Disappoints First-Generation College Student

BY Tonisha Johnson

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Thousands of students set to graduate from Ohio State University this spring will have to wait on taking that walk across the field to get their diploma. That's because the university has postponed spring commencement in light of the coronavirus outbreak.

At least 12,000 students were set to graduate from Ohio State this spring, but now with graduation suspended, disappointment has set in for many, including one first generation college student who was looking forward to her family seeing her get her diploma.

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LOCAL RESOURCES
Symptoms

The 2019 novel coronavirus may cause mild to severe respiratory symptoms like:

  • cough
  • fever
  • trouble breathing and
  • pneumonia

The CDC believes symptoms may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus.

(Source: NYS DOH)