Coronavirus Blog

SPECTRUM NEWS 1 CORONAVIRUS BLOG

Protesting During a Pandemic

BY Chelsea Washington

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Hand sanitizer and face masks were common sights at Jefferson Square on Wednesday. Most people doing their best to stay safe but not everyone chose to cover up.

Organizers say it’s a personal choice but they're doing their best to encourage people to fight for justice while keeping the pandemic front and center in their minds.

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Vodka, Gin, Sanitizer. Yes, Please.

BY Spectrum News Staff

VERSAILLES, Ky. ⁠— Kentuckians may know Castle and Key distillery for its classic spirits, but with the onset of coronavirus, the Woodford County distillery is also becoming known for something a little different: hand sanitizer.

"For us, really the decision to produce hand sanitizer, it was partially born out of necessity, looking for a unique way to help keep our employees engaged and part of the distillery, a unique revenue stream, but also as a way for us to help serve the common good," said Jon Netwon, sales manager for Castle and Key.

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Teenagers Rejoice: Permit Testing Resumes

BY Spectrum News Staff

KENTUCKY ⁠— Permit testing can now resume in select counties where the required CDC/Healthy at Work Guidelines can be followed, announced the Kentucky State Police (KSP) Driver Testing Branch. Beginning June 2, those who need a test can register and schedule a specific date via phone.



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Health Experts Fear Protests Could Spike Coronavirus Cases

BY Amber Smith

LOUISVILLE, Ky. - Health experts say protests could lead to a spike in coronavirus cases. Thousands have been gathering in crowds across the Commonwealth, particularly in Louisville. This is all coming at a time when Kentucky was just starting to slowly reopen.

UofL Health infectious disease specialist Dr. Forest Arnold said they were already anticipating a spike in cases as things started to reopen. Protests with people in close quarters will certainly not help.

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Kentucky Kingdom Releases Reopening Plan for June 29

BY Mario Anderson
UPDATED 9:58 AM ET Jun. 01, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Park management at Kentucky Kingdom said their park attractions and rides are ready to go, and their staff is now working on providing onboarding, training and certification for up to 1,400 seasonal team members.



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Driver's License Services Available Again

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 4:01 PM ET May. 29, 2020

FRANKFORT, Ky. ⁠— Circuit court clerks around the state will be able to resume limited driver's license services beginning June 1. But teens hoping to take a driver's road test and exam will need to wait for the Kentucky State Police to resume operations as it controls those services.

Driver's license services were suspended March 18 when Gov. Andy Beshear (D) closed in-person government services because of the coronavirus. Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Secretary Jim Gray issued an order giving everyone a 90-day extension on the validity of licenses that expired during the shutdown.

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Kentucky Artist Gives Back to Children's Summer Camp

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON, Ky. ⁠— Tyler Booth, a country singer from Kentucky, is using his music and social media platform to collect donations for Trooper Island.

Trooper Island is a free summer camp for children in Kentucky who may not be able to afford to go to camp on their own. During the camp, the children get to meet and interact with state troopers from all over the state of Kentucky.

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Kroger Announces New Hours for Seniors

BY Spectrum News Staff

LOUISVILLE, Ky. ⁠— Kroger's Louisville Division, which includes Kroger and Jay C stores across Kentucky, southern Indiana and southern Illinois, announced new hours for senior and at-risk shoppers in addition to expanding store hours.



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Fund for the Arts Dishes Out Thousands to Local Restaurants, Organizations

BY Spectrum News Staff

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — As local restaurants struggle in the wake of COVID-19, Fund for the Arts Culinary Initiative Strategic Relief Fund has doled out over $115,000 to seven local restaurants and organizations. The fund was launched in collaboration with Ashbourne Farms and is funded by Austin & Janie Musselman, Appalachian Impact Fund, numerous community donations and others.

“We have a long-term commitment to Kentucky’s culinary excellence, world-class hospitality and providing quality farm-to-table foods,” said Rodney Wedge, chief operating officer at Ashbourne Farms. “It drives everything we do, including our commitment to giving back to the community we serve. In this time of need, we are dedicated to supporting and sustaining our restaurants and hospitality businesses, which are the backbone of our local and regional economies and the lifeblood of a vibrant community, helping to define what is unique, authentic, and important to us.”

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KDE Provides Guidance as Schools Prepare for Fall

BY Ashleigh Mills
UPDATED 4:44 PM ET May. 28, 2020

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Public Health Commissioner Dr. Steven Stack called it "premature" to determine yet whether schools in Kentucky will reopen as usual for the fall semester. Stack appeared in the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) weekly webcast chat to offer advice to superintendents who are planning safety measures for the return to class.



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Food Pantry Gets a Needed Assist from the Homeless

BY Khyati Patel

COVINGTON, Ky. — A Northern Kentucky food pantry is helping to feed more people than usual thanks to charity donations.

In early April, Be Concerned food pantry transitioned into a carhop model to limit interaction. Since then, with the help of the Horizon Community Funds and local business, they’ve been able to hire additional help to meet demand.

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Which Places Are Safe Now That Kentucky is Reopening?

BY Ashleigh Mills
UPDATED 10:12 AM ET May. 28, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. —The economy is reopening little by little, in a phased approach for the Commonwealth. But, how safe is that restaurant, store, salon, gym, or campsite? Some doctors are offering their advice on what to look for when it comes to safety, and when people might want to stay home instead of venturing out.

Dr. Laura Bishop, Doctor of Internal Medicine at UofL Hospital, uses these words to test whether to wade into a recently reopened space: place, people, space, time.

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ACLU Challenges Voter Photo ID Requirement

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 9:00 AM ET May. 28, 2020

KENTUCKY ⁠— The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), along with several other groups, filed a federal lawsuit May 27, challenging Kentucky's voter ID requirement and asking the state to extend vote-by-mail past June.

Kentucky's photo ID requirement, the ACLU claims, puts voters at risk by forcing them to visit ID-issuing offices and potentially exposing themselves to COVID-19.

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Flying the Lonely Skies During a Pandemic

BY Jonathon Gregg
UPDATED 9:00 AM ET May. 28, 2020

FLORENCE, Ky. — The airline industry is one of many to suffer mightily during the coronavirus pandemic.

At one point it was reported U.S. air travel had dropped 95% percent from the same time a year ago. However, as parts of the country continue to open up more Americans are heading to the airport.

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How Thermal Technology Could Help Businesses During Pandemic

BY Jamilah Muhammad

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. — John Harnage, founder of the Kentucky Thermal Institute, like many other small busy owners, worried about the fallout his business would suffer because of the coronavirus. However, receiving personal protective equipment (PPE) and a small business loan, Harnage didn’t worry for long. Originally specializing in thermal imaging to find issues with electrical wiring, energy use, and insulation, he began thinking of ways he could use thermal technology to profit in a time where thermal body heat was a key identifier of health.

In March, Harnage started outlining how his body temperature system could be used by the military, in malls, airports, schools, and other areas. He also started the process of securing the parts he would need for the project.

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Coronavirus Testing Site Caters to Hispanics

BY David Guildford

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Receiving a drive-thru coronavirus test is often described, by willing participants, as quick and necessary; but you likely won’t hear them say they enjoyed their time spent with a swab inside their nasal cavity.

For millions of Americans whose first language isn’t English, those few stressful seconds can extend to the entire journey.

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Governor Beshear: "I Will Not Be Bullied"

BY Joe Ragusa

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Gov. Andy Beshear said he won’t be bullied by protestors upset with his restrictions put in place because of the coronavirus.

"I will not be afraid. I will not be bullied. And I will not back down," Beshear said. "Not to them and not to anybody else."

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Interns on the Front Lines of Coronavirus Testing

BY Khyati Patel

COVINGTON, Ky. — A Northern Kentucky coronavirus testing lab is rapidly expanding.

Gravity Diagnostics has not only increased the processing of testing samples but also added more personnel, including interns, to help meet demand.

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Nazareth Home Undergoes Facility-wide Coronavirus Testing

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 4:21 PM ET May. 26, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A nursing home in the Clifton neighborhood of Louisville is dealing with more than 60 residents and staff members with coronavirus.

38 residents and 26 staff members of the Nazareth Home Clifton have tested positive for the disease. There were 82 residents tested and they have been taken to the hospital. 43 remain segregated in at the 101-bed facility.

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Mayor Says Coronavirus is Killing Louisville African Americans Disproportionately

BY David Guildford
UPDATED 4:11 PM ET May. 26, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Mayor Greg Fischer, D - Louisville, reports African Americans currently account for 33 percent of the coronavirus-related deaths in the city while making up 23 percent of its population. On Tuesday, Fischer held a discussion with local experts to layout problems and try to find solutions. T Gonzales the Director for the Louisville Center for Health Equity and Kendall Boyd Louisville Metro's Chief Equity Officer joined Fischer for the Facebook Town Hall meeting.

The group acknowledged decades-long income and housing disparities contribute to poorer health care, as well as additional pre-existing conditions like diabetes and hypertension.

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You Can Help Kentucky Researchers Learn More About Coronavirus

BY Spectrum News Staff

LEXINGTON, Ky. ⁠— With the hope of learning how to stop the spread of COVID-19, researchers at the University of Kentucky are asking people to complete a survey for the university's COVID-19 Prevention Project, part of the Wellness, Health, and You (WHY) research program. WHY seeks to understand how different life experiences affect wellbeing.

The COVID-19 Prevention Project asks how people are protecting themselves since understanding how to stop the spread of the coronavirus is crucial to saving lives and re-opening the economy. While there is still much left to learn about COVID-19, the virus spreads between people in close proximity to one another.

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Reopening and the Coronavirus

BY Cris Mullen

LOUISVILLE, Ky. ⁠— Americans, it would appear, are done with the coronavirus. Just like Justin Bieber, planking or the ice bucket challenge, the pandemic has overstayed its welcome. It needs to do the right thing and retreat back into the shadows so we can dive into the next fad and spit it out as well.

If you’ve watched any news this weekend, you’ve seen streams of people flocking to beaches. At Volusia County, Florida official says there are 47 miles of shore front in the county and every bit of it has crowds. Similar scenes are unfolding up and down our coasts, at our lakes and in bars and restaurants.

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Wildcat Mobile Gym Brings Fitness to the Streets

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON, Ky. ⁠— A Lexington gym owner is making changes to his business by taking his workouts on wheels. The Wildcat Mobile Gym is now bringing workouts to their clients.

DeMarcus Lewis, the owner of Wildcat Mobile Gym, has been a personal trainer for more than 17 years. That’s why when the gyms closed he wanted to make sure he could still help his clients during these tough times.

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Two Protests At Capitol Have Different Messages But Same Intention

BY Eileen Street

FRANKFORT, Ky. — On Saturday at Kentucky’s capitol, two separate protests took place. One was a Freedom Rally against Gov. Andy Beshear’s handling of coronavirus. The other was about the conditions at Green River Correctional Complex that has a number of COVID-19 cases. At one point, the two became one.

At the Freedom Rally, Connie Kerth said her civil rights have been violated.

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Norton Children's Medical Associates Introduces Food Pantry Program for Patients

BY Michael Cadigan
UPDATED 10:10 AM ET May. 24, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. ⁠— Pediatricians have special bonds with the families they care for. But sometimes, their relationship goes beyond prescriptions.

Many families in Louisville and southern Indiana struggle to provide healthy meals for children. This is due to many factors, including cost, “food deserts” and travel. Food insecurity has negative effects on a child’s health and lifelong well-being.

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Taking Time for Yourself: The Importance of Self-Care

BY Michael Cadigan
UPDATED 9:58 AM ET May. 24, 2020

KENTUCKY ⁠— Devoting time each day to self-care can go a long way toward staying mentally, physically and spiritually healthy.

Mental health professionals have spent years trying to take away the stigma that mental health has. The coronavirus pandemic has people worried about jobs, bills, loved ones and the virus itself.

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Lexington Nonprofit Feeds Frontline Workers

BY Crystal Sicard
UPDATED 12:05 PM ET May. 23, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. ⁠— A nonprofit in Lexington made up of medical students, young professionals and college students is now collecting donations to help feed frontline workers.

Feed the Front Line is a national organization, and in April, students in Lexington decided to start a chapter in Kentucky.

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Veteran's Group Supports Frontline Heroes With Free Equine Therapy

BY Michael Cadigan
UPDATED 10:11 AM ET May. 23, 2020

TAYLORSVILLE, Ky. ⁠— Veteran’s Club, an organization that provides resources to Kentucky veterans, has decided to open up its individual equine sessions for all frontline heroes.

Veteran’s Club defines frontline heroes as anyone working in healthcare, first responders, grocery store employees, truck drivers, mail carriers, delivery persons, sanitation workers and custodians.

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Let's Go Inside Amazon

BY Khyati Patel

JEFFERSONVILLE, In. — Amazon has gained a lot of attention in recent months as the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded.

Now, in a rare look inside, Amazon offered an exclusive tour of one of their facilities to show the safety measures put in place.

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UK President Saves Jobs, But Outlines Stark Budget

BY Spectrum News Staff

LEXINGTON, Ky. — While COVID-19 strains budgets across the state, University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto announced the school's budget for next year will not include reductions in force, and fewer employees are being placed on administrative no-pay status than first estimated.

In a move that will save roughly 100 jobs, Capilouto is directing a portion of UK's "contingency fund," meant to help deal with crises, to the upcoming year's budget. The budget will be under consideration by UK's Board of Trustees at its June meeting.

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$130 Million in CARES Money Headed to Nursing Facilities

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 3:59 PM ET May. 22, 2020

KENTUCKY — Kentucky is set to receive nearly $130 million which will be distributed to 347 skilled nursing facilities across the state as they battle COVID-19. The money, which will be distributed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), comes from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, introduced by Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

Each skilled nursing facility is eligible to receive roughly $50,000, and HHS will distribute an additional payment of $2,500 per bed to facilities with six or more beds. The funds may be used for conronavirus-related expenses such as paying staff salaries, increasing testing and purchasing personal protective equipment.

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Welcome Back Customers! Restaurants Open Again

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON,Ky. — With restaurants reopening in Kentucky, many owners are excited to welcome customers back into their dining areas.

Gwyn Everly owner of J. Render’s Southern Table and Bar in Lexington is just one of the many owners that are ready to go back to serving her customers. With precautions being done to both inside and outdoor seating, they are taking reservations to make sure they do not exceed the 33% capacity limit.

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Louisville to Hike, Bike and Paddle Online This Year

BY Spectrum News Staff

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, the Mayor's Hike, Bike and Paddle will be virtual this year, meaning the semiannual event won't be drawing thousands to Waterfront Park this Memorial Day, Mayor Greg Fischer announced.



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JCPS Serves One Million Meals While Closed

BY Spectrum News Staff

LOUISVILLE, Ky. ⁠— After closing due to COVID-19, Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) announced May 22 that it served its one millionth free meal for students at one of its emergency food sites.



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Child Care Centers Struggle As Kentucky Reopens

BY Joe Ragusa
UPDATED 11:14 AM ET May. 22, 2020



FORT WRIGHT, Ky. — Christine Fairfield runs the Little Links To Learning child care center in Fort Wright, a facility that had to close due to the governor’s orders March 20.

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Fischer Urges Voting From Home

BY Spectrum News Staff

LOUISVILLE, Ky. – As COVID-19 limits in-person contact, Mayor Greg Fischer (D) is urging Louisville voters to request mail-in absentee ballots. An executive order by Gov. Andy Beshear (D) and Secretary of State Michael Adams (R) allows all eligible voters to vote by mail in the upcoming June 23 primary.

“This bi-partisan plan was adopted to protect the health and safety of all Kentuckians — both voters and poll workers — by avoiding in-person voting during the pandemic as much as possible,” said Fischer. “I normally encourage everyone to get out and vote. This year I am encouraging everyone to stay in – but still vote.”

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Restaurants Can Reopen, But Not All Are

BY Jonathon Gregg

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Restaurants in Kentucky can reopen for business tomorrow but only at 33% capacity. But not all restaurants are eager to reopen. Four Pegs in Louisville will leave its chairs turned over.

"Right now it’s a disaster area, we’re painting and remodeling," owner Chris Williams says with a laugh.

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Heroes Don't Always Wear a Cape

BY Spectrum News Staff

VERSAILLES, Ky. ⁠— Heroes aren’t difficult to find in Woodford County.

That’s why its residents have taken it upon themselves to launch the “Unsung Heroes” campaign meant to recognize everyday heroes doing extraordinary things.

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Norton Expands Access to COVID-19 Testing

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 10:23 AM ET May. 21, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Norton Healthcare announced it will begin COVID-19 testing for anyone in the community, making it easier for Louisvillians to find out if they have the virus.

“Now that we have a sufficient supply of test kits, we are eager to open up our testing,” said Russell Cox, president and CEO of Norton Healthcare. “Many people are concerned they may have COVID-19, or may have been exposed, and want to know if they are at risk of passing the infection to others. Giving more individuals access to testing in all parts of our community is important to us.”

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Money Coming to Local Governments to Pay for COVID-19

BY Spectrum News Staff

FRANKFORT, Ky. – City and county governments will share in a $300 million award as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act to help deal with expenses brought on by the coronavirus

Gov. Andy Beshear (D) announced the award Wednesday. The money will be administered by the Department for Local Government (DLG) and can be used for reimbursements of expenses necessary to meet public health guidelines.

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Child Abuse Reporting Down as Result of Coronavirus

BY Michon Lindstrom
UPDATED 3:44 PM ET May. 20, 2020

KENTUCKY — Kentucky has the highest rate of child abuse in the country but currently, the state is seeing a drop in reporting as schools and daycare centers remain closed as a result of the coronavirus.

"Our biggest source of reporting to DCBS (Department for Community Based Services) is our schools and daycares, family and friends are up there on the list as well, and all of those groups have been removed from the kids,” said Dr. Melissa Currie, Medical Director and Chief at Norton Children’s Pediatric Protection Team Affiliated with the University of Louisville School of Medicine. “So there just aren't as many eyes on the kids to see signs of abuse or neglect to report it.”

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Families to Receive Money for Student Lunches

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 3:42 PM ET May. 20, 2020

KENTUCKY — Kentucky, along with Tennessee and Washington D.C., is now approved to operate Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT), a new program which provides assistance to families with children eligible for free or reduced-price meals while COVID-19 forces schools to close.



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London's Calling, But the Cats Can't Come

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 11:59 AM ET May. 20, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Set to begin in the upcoming season, the three-year series between University of Kentucky and University of Michigan’s men’s basketball teams is postponed due to COVID-19 concerns.

The teams will now play in Ann Arbor in 2021, the inaugural Basketball Hall of Fame London Showcase in 2022 and Lexington in 2023.

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It's Shopping Time Again

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 10:39 AM ET May. 20, 2020

KENTUCKY — As part of Kentucky’s gradual reopening, some retailers will welcome back customers at one-third capacity and with several health and safety restrictions May 20.



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Going Shopping Wednesday? Here's what you Should Know

BY Jonathon Gregg

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — After being closed for two-months, businesses across Kentucky will reopen Wednesday, albeit, under a range of guidelines.

“And we hope people will rejoice we are back open…” Paul Kinzer said Tuesday. Kinzer is a long-time employee of Bonnycastle Appliance & TV on Bardstown Road.

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Court Is Back in Session

BY Spectrum News Staff

FRANKFORT, Ky. — The Supreme Court of Kentucky will resume in-person court services beginning June 1, following the formation of three task forces to ensure a safe reopening.

“Our priority is to implement a limited, phased reopening that will allow greater access to the courts while keeping court personnel and the public safe through social distancing and other precautions,” Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton Jr. said in an email May 15 to justices, judges, circuit court clerks and court personnel in the judicial branch.

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High Unemployment Rates Likely Not Going Away Soon

BY Michon Lindstrom

KENTUCKY ⁠— Retail stores and restaurants are beginning to reopen this week in Kentucky, but experts are warning it could be a slow start before businesses are profitable again.

“We don't have a vaccine, we don't have a treatment, there's going to be uncertainty and there's going to be a lack of consumer confidence,” said Jason Bailey, executive director of the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy (KCEP). “The economy, even if it begins to improve in the fall, will still be far below where it was before.”

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Full Speed Ahead for Rupp Renovation

BY Mario Anderson
UPDATED 9:48 AM ET May. 19, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. — With event cancellations left and right, the entertainment industry in the Commonwealth has been hit hard by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Management at Rupp Arena says their iconic facility and event space was well on it’s way to another record-setting revenue year until the coronavirus pandemic forced the venue to cancel every scheduled event inside the arena and convention center through at least the end of June.

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Mom is Out of ICU After Nearly Two Months

BY Ashleigh Mills

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — After spending months in the intensive care unit (ICU) at Baptist Health Louisville, Paula Eaton finally tested negative for COVID-19 about one week ago. Her family gathered over the weekend to greet her as she left Baptist Health and was transported, on a gurney, to Kindred Hospital downtown. Although the in-person visit was short, daughter Julie Abbott cherished the few moments she got to lay eyes on her mother.

"She is definitely a fighter. We're all king of mindblown at this point, as to how her body has been able to withstand it," said Abbott.

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Lexington Begins Road to Economic Recovery

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON, Ky. — As Kentucky slowly starts to reopen, the city of Lexington is making its first steps toward economic recovery.

The Mayor of Lexington, Linda Gorton, and the CEO of Central Bank, Luther Deaton, sent over a blueprint for the Lexington economic recovery plans to the governor's office this week.

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24-Year-Old Credits Plasma and Prayer for COVID-19 Recovery

BY Amber Smith
UPDATED 6:16 PM ET May. 18, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — After 20 days in the hospital battling COVID-19, a 24-year-old Louisville woman is home happy and healthy. While she is doing better now, it was a long road to get to this point. Hannah Jones says it would not have been possible without a plasma donation and a lot of prayers.

It was late March when Jones first noticed she was not feeling well. She had some pain in her stomach, but doctors didn't know why. They thought it was just acid reflux until she decided to get looked at again on April 1 when her symptoms worsened.

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Driver License Office is Back in Business

BY Spectrum News Staff

FRANKFORT, Ky. — As part of his Healthy at Work initiative, Gov. Andy Beshear (D) announced the regional driver licensing office at the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) building in Frankfort has reopened for limited services.

“We want to begin reopening our Commonwealth in a safe, gradual and well-planned manner that protects employees and customers,” said Beshear. “The Frankfort-based regional licensing office is reopening with limited in-person services to process the most immediate needs first and to prevent a surge in foot traffic.”

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Miss Kentucky Gets a Second Tour

BY Mario Anderson
UPDATED 3:08 PM ET May. 18, 2020

KENTUCKY — Following the Miss America Organization's decision to delay all competitions until 2021, the Miss Kentucky Scholarshiop Organization recently announced that the 2020 Miss Kentucky and Miss Kentucky's Outstanding Teen Competition have also been postponed until summer 2021 due to ongoing coronoavirus concerns.

This means the current titleholder Alex Francke, will have another year of serving the state as the first-ever 2x Miss Kentucky.

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Kentucky Castle Donates to Frontline Workers

BY Crystal Sicard

VERSAILLES, Ky. — With The Kentucky Castle in Versailles closed due to the coronavirus, the employees decided to give back to the community by using their resources to prepare and deliver meals to frontline workers.

"We are going all over the community, you know, we're really targeting the people that are on the front lines that are helping the other people that are in need," Director of Health and Wellness, Rebecca Dickerson said.

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Coronavirus Proving Helpful for Personal Saving

BY Michael Cadigan

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Americans are slashing their spending, hoarding cash, and shrinking their credit card debt during the coronavirus pandemic.

“There are consumers that are saving more money now because they are in fear of losing a job, or they have already lost their job and are receiving unemployment payments,” said Aaron McAndrew, a wealth advisor.

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You Never Know who Will Be Teaching Class

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON, Ky. — With the transition to non-traditional instruction (NTI), a 4th-grade teacher from Garden Springs Elementary School in Lexington has been finding new and creative ways to keep his students engaged.

The method Shad Lacefield has chosen — dressing up in different costumes for his online science lessons.

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Group Helping Feed Those with Allergies

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON,Ky. — Gluten Free Miracles and Azur Restaurant and Patio are making free family-sized meals for those who are allergic to gluten or have other food allergies.

“If you have dietary restrictions or food allergies or celiac disease. And that's bad enough, those ingredients are so expensive.” owner of Gluten Free Miracles, Denise Walsh.

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Days Away From Shopping Again

BY Michael Cadigan

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — It has been more than two months since Governor Andy Beshear (D) closed non-essential businesses because of the coronavirus pandemic. That category included retail businesses.



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Just How Ready is Kentucky to Reopen

BY Joe Ragusa
UPDATED 11:02 AM ET May. 16, 2020

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Kentucky made headlines Thursday for being one of only two states that appeared to be ready to reopen. That coverage appears to be short-lived.

The researchers behind the rankings at covidexitstrategy.org say testing numbers in Kentucky bounced around and now the average is below the White House target.

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COVID-19 Forces Storied College Access Program to Adapt

BY Eva McKend
UPDATED 10:07 AM ET May. 16, 2020

WASHINGTON, DC — With her eyes on becoming an attorney, Sydney Johnson has always been ambitious but wonders if she would be going to Kentucky State University this fall on a full scholarship if it were not for the support of the Lincoln Foundation.

"I don’t think I would have these opportunities without them propelling me," she said.

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Maryhurst Deals with Coronavirus Outbreak Among Staff and Residents

BY Spectrum News Staff

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — After discovering 27 positive cases of COVID-19 among staff and clients, child welfare nonprofit organization Maryhurst announced how it is responding to the outbreak at its residential campus.

The positive cases include 15 staff and 12 clients; however, 155 staff remain untested. All residents have received tests.

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Lexington Hospital Ease Rules Slightly for Health Care Reopening

BY Spectrum News Staff

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Following recent guidance from Governor Andy Beshear (D), several Lexington hospitals will allow one visitor per patient beginning May 18.

Baptist Health, CHI Saint Joseph Health, and UK HealthCare are easing visitor restrictions as they resume non-emergent and non-urgent procedures as part of Kentucky’s healthcare reopening.

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Food is Served But Not Before Zoning Changes

BY Khyati Patel

ERLANGER, Ky. — Some cities in Northern Kentucky are taking extra steps to help restaurants.

During the reopening process, at least three cities have relaxed zoning regulations to allow outdoor seating.

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The Race for a Coronavirus Vaccine

BY Erin Billups
UPDATED 6:30 AM ET May. 15, 2020

A massive global race to find the best vaccine is on and U.S. health officials say a vaccine could potentially be available as soon as January. It’s an ambitious timeline for those in vaccine research, but the safest and fastest way to gain widespread immunity to COVID-19, and return to a pre-pandemic level of normalcy.

“Problem with vaccines is it's really slow. It takes twelve to 18 months,” said Paul Duprex, director of the Center for Vaccine Research at the University of Pittsburgh. “Why is it slow? Because it has to be really safe. We cannot do anything fast and compromise vaccine safety.”

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The Joy Behind Keeping Woodford County Kids Fed

BY Spectrum News Staff

WOODFORD COUNTY, Ky. — It’s a school program that is still going at full speed even after the COVID-19 pandemic has closed the classroom doors.

Courtney Quire is the food service director for Woodford County Public Schools and she and her staff are helping their community in a big way.

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Telehealth Makes Life Easier for Cancer Patient

BY Michael Cadigan

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The coronavirus pandemic has lead to the expansion of health professionals using telehealth as a means for doctors and patients to stay connected.

Misty Aubrey is fighting her stage 4 neuroendocrine carcinoma during coronavirus pandemic.

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Shower Door Maker Saves Jobs during Pandemic with this Design

BY Jonathon Gregg

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — It didn’t take long for the leaders of Louisville's HMI Cardinal to make a change in production that potentially saved a countless number of jobs in Kentucky.

“This development took us just a few days to come up with a comprehensive catalog of solutions,” Diego Rodriguez VP of Sales & Marketing at HMI Cardinal told Spectrum News 1.

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Ousted Federal Vaccine Chief Says Window Closing to Prevent COVID-19 Surge in the Fall

BY Eva McKend

WASHINGTON, DC — A career government scientist says decision-makers have a limited window to ramp up the federal response to the novel coronavirus. Dr. Rick Bright alleges he was pushed out of his role for disagreeing with the Trump administration on strategy and that lives were lost as a result.

The ousted federal vaccine chief testified before a House subcommittee Thursday, telling lawmakers time is running out to prevent a resurgence of COVID-19 in the fall.

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She Specializes in Infectious Diseases, Now Kentucky Doctor Fights COVID-19

BY Spectrum News Staff

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. — Bowling Green has 708 cases of coronavirus as of Wednesday. One of those battling the disease is Dr. Rebecca Shadowen, who is with Infectious Diseases, Travel Medicine, and Healthcare Epidemiology at Med Center Health, announced Wednesday she tested positive for COVID-19 and is in the hospital.

Shadowen believes she got the virus after an elderly family member received in-home care from an infected caregiver.

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A Mother Shares Her Experience With Kawasaki Disease

BY Khyati Patel

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Governor Andy Beshear (D) and his team are dealing with the state’s first child patient presumed to have a rare disease.

Health professionals think it might be a complication from COVID-19.

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Farmers "Taking a Hit" As Meat Shortage Continues

BY Ashleigh Mills

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Cattle are a little less profitable for farmers these days, according to Kentucky's Commissioner of Agriculture Ryan Quarles (R).

The coronavirus pandemic has played a role in decreasing value for livestock like cattle, which Quarles says is 30-40% down. It's because of meat processors either shutting down or working more slowly; that's been a hardship for some farmers, and a meat shortage for Kentuckians.

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Metro Council Urges Congress To Help Renters

BY David Guildford

LOUISVILLE, Ky — Kentucky renters who may be struggling with their finances could be in trouble come July. That's when the ban on evictions in the state comes to an end. Members of the Louisville Metro Council are calling on Washington to provide some relief.

Metro Council President David James (D, Dist. 6) announced Monday he’s be presenting a resolution to the council Thursday. It urges legislators in Washington, DC to include protections for renters in the next stimulus proposal. Spectrum News 1 asked James what recourse the city had if it doesn’t get the help it wants.

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The “New Normal” Of Buying A Car

BY Eileen Street

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — On Monday a few industries were able to open their doors under Governor Andy Beshear’s (D-Kentucky) phased reopening of the commonwealth’s economy called Healthy At Work. One of those industries included car dealerships.

“It’s good to get out, just a little nervous I guess,” said Tony McBride of Louisville.

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Racing Coming Back to Churchill Downs, Fans Not Included

BY Jonathon Gregg

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Horse racing returns to Churchill Downs this weekend and the first round of thoroughbreds began arriving Monday morning.

Unfortunately for race fans, they will not have access to Churchill Downs, at least, not until Kentucky lifts restrictions on public gatherings. Still, for trainers and their staff, this is very positive news.

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Health Professionals Warn of Looming Mental Health Crisis

BY Michael Cadigan

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Health officials warn of another health crisis that will follow the COVID-19 pandemic.

“COVID-19 has really created the perfect storm for people that suffer from addiction and mental illness,” said Dr. Sarah Johnson, the chief medical officer from Landmark Recovery.

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Ultimate Ninja Gym Staying Positive Through Pandemic

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON, Ky. —The coronavirus has impacted many small businesses throughout the pandemic with the Ultimate Ninja in Lexington being one of them.

“All ages, all levels of athleticism. So I have obstacles in here that a one-year-old can do, and I have obstacles in here that 99% of people can't do.” said the owner of Ultimate Ninja, Brendan Kelly.

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University of Louisville Virtually Honors Class of 2020

BY Eileen Street

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Saturday, May 9, 2020, was commencement day for the University of Louisville's 2020 graduates. But the traditional ceremony at the KFC Yum! Center is on hold until December because of coronavirus. However, the university still honored Cardinal graduates virtually for their hard work and perseverance, not just during the pandemic but over the last four years.

A "Here and Beyond 2020" website went live Saturday morning that paid tribute to the graduates. The site was so popular that it temporarily crashed.

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UofL Researchers Make a Prototype N95 Mask That's Machine-Washable and Reusable

BY Eileen Street

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — An N95 mask that can be disinfected by simply throwing it into a washing machine would solve a lot of problems for those on the frontlines of the coronavirus.

Soon, it could be a reality thanks to research and development from the University of Louisville's Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research and Advanced Energy Materials, LLC (ADEM).

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The U.S. May Face a Second Wave of Coronavirus Infections

BY Erin Billups
UPDATED 7:45 AM ET May. 09, 2020

The latest data shows the country’s efforts at social distancing are beginning to have an impact. In areas hardest hit by the coronavirus, new reported cases are dropping.

While the trends are promising, health officials and scientists warn, it’s still too soon to relax social distancing measures. Easing up on restrictions could lead to a surge of deadly infections known as a “second wave.”

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New Device Lets You Open a Door Without Touching It

BY Crystal Sicard

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Peggy’s Gift and Accessories are now selling fabric face masks and a new device that will make avoiding doors a lot easier, hands-free keyrings.

By using the loop on the hands-free keyring, you can pull it through the door handle and open up the door without touching the door with your hands.

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Restaurants To Resume In-Person Dining Memorial Day Weekend

BY Jamilah Muhammad

BOWLING GREEN, Ky. — Restaurants will be allowed to return to in-person dining on May 22 but at only 33% capacity. Governor Andy Beshear, D-KY, announced the plan Thursday. One restaurant ready to open is Anna’s Greek Restaurant in Bowling Green.

The restaurant just opened its doors in December, just months before having to close again. Owner Vilson Qehaja quickly began using delivery apps like GrubHub and Door Dash, as well as providing carryout options to keep customers.

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Coronavirus Causes Change to Kentucky's June Primary

BY Ashleigh Mills
UPDATED 9:54 AM ET May. 08, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The pandemic pushed back Kentucky's primary to June 23. Now, more changes are revealed; the Secretary of State's office and Governor Andy Beshear says the goal is to lessen the number of people gathering close together to cast a ballot. Absentee ballots will be made available to all registered voters.



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UPDATED: Kentucky Drive-thru Coronavirus Testing Sites

BY Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 12:19 PM ET May. 07, 2020

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — As more and more testing takes place across the state, we wanted to make it easy for you to find the closest location to you. Here is a list that we will continue to keep updated.



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Lyon County Celebrates a 109 Year Old Treasure

BY Jamilah Muhammad
UPDATED 12:01 PM ET May. 07, 2020

KUTTAWA, Ky. — Ruth Evelyn Harrington has every reason to celebrate.

Born May 6, 1911, Harrington has celebrated birthdays through two world wars, 17 presidents, prohibition, and now a global pandemic.

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Lawsuits Against Gov. Beshear's COVID-19 Orders Begin to Mount

BY Michon Lindstrom

FRANKFORT, Ky. — Another church has filed a lawsuit against Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear’s ban on in-person church services.

First Liberty Institute filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of Eastern Kentucky on behalf of Tabernacle Baptist Church in Nicholasville saying the March 19 executive order banning all mass gatherings, including in-person church services, went against the First Amendment. This is the third lawsuit filed against Beshear because of the ban on in-person church services Republican Attorney General Daniel Cameron has asked to join the lawsuit filed on behalf of Tabernacle after threatening to launch his lawsuit against Beshear’s order last week.

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The Wright Stuff: One Nurse's Inspiring Story

BY Jonathon Gregg

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — As the nation celebrates, “National Nurses Day,” Spectrum News 1 would like to share the story of Tabatha Wright.

The ICU Nurse Manager at Norton Women and Children’s Hospital has an inspiring 21-year-career that began even farther back.

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LOCAL RESOURCES
Symptoms

The 2019 novel coronavirus may cause mild to severe respiratory symptoms like:

  • cough
  • fever
  • trouble breathing and
  • pneumonia

The CDC believes symptoms may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus.

(Source: NYS DOH)