EDITOR'S NOTE: Multimedia journalist Jaqueline Hurtado spoke to a street vendor in the San Fernando Valley battling the heat wave that has hit much of Southern California. Hurtado also spoke to a doctor about the dangers of heat stroke and ways to prevent it.

LOS ANGELES — An excessive heat warming will be in place for much of the Southland Sunday as a high-pressure system blanketing much of the southwestern United States continues to push temperatures into the triple- digits, according to the National Weather Service.


What You Need To Know

  • The NWS issued a heat advisory that will be in effect from 10 a.m. Saturday through 8 p.m. Sunday for the Santa Clarita, San Fernando and San Gabriel valleys

  • An excessive heat watch will be in place from Saturday morning through Sunday evening across the Antelope Valley and the San Gabriel Mountains, along with the Antelope Valley (14) Freeway corridor

  • First responders already rescued one man who suffered dehydration while hiking Saturday in the Pacific Palisades, and authorities were warning people to stay out of the sun if possible and to use caution when exerting themselves

  • The city and county of Los Angeles both operate cooling centers for people who need a place to escape the heat

“Expect temperatures ranging from 102 to 108 degrees across the Antelope Valley, from 90 to 100 for the interior valleys, and in the mid 80s to mid 90s for inland coastal plains,” the National Weather Service said. “Only the beaches will see temperatures in the 70s, with upper 60s possible along the Central Coast.”

The NWS issued advisory will remain in effect through at least 8 p.m. Sunday for the Santa Clarita, San Fernando and San Gabriel valleys, where forecasters said some temperatures are most likely to hit triple-digits.

An excessive heat watch will be in place through Sunday evening across the Antelope Valley and the San Gabriel Mountains, along with the Antelope Valley (14) Freeway corridor.

“Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors,” forecasters advised.

First responders already rescued one man who suffered dehydration while hiking Saturday in the Pacific Palisades, and authorities were warning people to stay out of the sun if possible and to use caution when exerting themselves.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a heat advisory for the valley areas for Sunday.

“On hot days, it’s important for everyone to both take care of themselves and check on others, especially those who have a higher chance of getting ill due to the heat. Some of them include children, the elderly, those with health conditions, pregnant people, those living alone, and pets,” Dr. Muntu Davis, Los Angeles County Health Officer, said in a statement. “Hot days can be dangerous for anyone, so it’s crucial to stay cool and hydrated.

“Never leave children, the elderly, or pets alone in hot homes, places, or vehicles,” Davis added.

The city and county of Los Angeles both operate cooling centers for people who need a place to escape the heat. To find a location, visit here or call 211.

Meanwhile, the South Coast Air Quality Management District issued a smog advisory through 7 p.m. Tuesday, covering most non-coastal areas of Los Angeles County and stretching into much of Riverside County. AQMD officials said the extreme heat will likely lead to unhealthy or worse air quality conditions in much of the area.

The AQMD urged residents to check air quality levels and limit outdoor activities, limit the use of gasoline-powered lawn and garden equipment until evening hours and conserve electricity.